Intense microwave pulse ionizes its own channel through plasma

October 9, 2018, American Institute of Physics

Breakthrough new research shows that ionization-induced self-channeling of a microwave beam can be achieved at a significantly lower power of the microwave beam and gas pressure for radially nonuniform plasma with minimal on-axis density than in the case of plasma formed as the result of gas ionization.

In the journal Physics of Plasmas, Israel Institute of Technology researchers report observing this effect for the first time and studying it in detail in a plasma preliminarily formed by a radiofrequency discharge, in a low-pressure gas (<150 Pa). They were able to do this by using analytical modeling and numerical particle-in-cell simulations, and their work centers on the concept of the nonlinear effect on plasma and magnetic wave interaction.

"Ionization-induced plasma self-channeling is the foundation for microwave plasma wakefield research," said lead author Yang Cao. "A plasma wakefield is a wave generated by particles traveling through a plasma. And a microwave plasma wakefield experiment could give us information about laser wakefield research that's extremely difficult to obtain due to the short time (femtosecond) and geometry scale involved."

This work is significant because microwaves will always diverge, unlike lasers that can be trapped within optical fibers. "In this [way], a self-induced 'microwave fiber' is created that may help the microwave propagate a much longer distance," Cao said.

In the future, the microwave ionization-induced self-channeling effect could be used for further exploring the microwave wakefield or, since it's a form of directed energy, it may also find military applications as a directed-energy weapon.

Explore further: Aboard the ISS, researchers investigate complex dust behavior in plasmas

More information: Y. Cao et al, Self-channeling of a powerful microwave beam in a preliminarily formed plasma, Physics of Plasmas (2018). DOI: 10.1063/1.5051226

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Solon
not rated yet Oct 09, 2018
Likely applicable to plasma astrophysics, wakefields are detected out there.
http://www.slac.s.../C08.PDF
Steelwolf
5 / 5 (1) Oct 23, 2018
Thank You Solon. Excellent information

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