Aussie telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious 'fast radio bursts'

October 10, 2018, International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research
Artist's impression of CSIRO's Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope observing 'fast radio bursts' in 'fly's eye mode'. Each antenna points in a slightly different direction, giving maximum sky coverage. Credit: OzGrav, Swinburne University of Technology

Australian researchers using a CSIRO radio telescope in Western Australia have nearly doubled the known number of 'fast radio bursts'— powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space.

The team's discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected.

Their findings were reported today in the journal Nature

Fast radio bursts come from all over the sky and last for just milliseconds.

Scientists don't know what causes them but it must involve incredible energy—equivalent to the amount released by the Sun in 80 years.

"We've found 20 fast radio bursts in a year, almost doubling the number detected worldwide since they were discovered in 2007," said lead author Dr. Ryan Shannon, from Swinburne University of Technology and the OzGrav ARC Centre of Excellence.

"Using the new technology of the Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), we've also proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood."

Co-author Dr. Jean-Pierre Macquart, from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), said bursts travel for billions of years and occasionally pass through clouds of gas.

An artist's impression of CSIRO's ASKAP radio telescope detecting a fast radio burst (FRB). Scientists don't know what causes FRBs but it must involve incredible energy -- equivalent to the amount released by the Sun in 80 years. Credit: OzGrav, Swinburne University of Technology
"Each time this happens, the different wavelengths that make up a burst are slowed by different amounts," he said.

"Eventually, the burst reaches Earth with its spread of wavelengths arriving at the telescope at slightly different times, like swimmers at a finish line.

"Timing the arrival of the different wavelengths tells us how much material the burst has travelled through on its journey.

"And because we've shown that fast radio bursts come from far away, we can use them to detect all the missing matter located in the space between galaxies—which is a really exciting discovery."

CSIRO's Dr. Keith Bannister, who engineered the systems that detected the bursts, said ASKAP's phenomenal discovery rate is down to two things. 

"The telescope has a whopping field of view of 30 square degrees, 100 times larger than the full Moon," he said. 

"And, by using the telescope's dish antennas in a radical way, with each pointing at a different part of the sky, we observed 240 square degrees all at once—about a thousand times the area of the full Moon. 

"ASKAP is astoundingly good for this work."

Antennas of CSIRO's Australian SKA Pathfinder with the Milky Way overhead. Credit: Alex Cherney/CSIRO

Dr. Shannon said we now know that fast bursts originate from about halfway across the Universe but we still don't know what causes them or which galaxies they come from.

The team's next challenge is to pinpoint the locations of bursts on the sky.

"We'll be able to localise the bursts to better than a thousandth of a degree," Dr. Shannon said.

"That's about the width of a human hair seen ten metres away, and good enough to tie each burst to a particular galaxy."

ASKAP is located at CSIRO's Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia and is a precursor for the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope. 

The SKA could observe large numbers of , giving astronomers a way to study the early Universe in detail.  

The researchers and their institutions acknowledge the Wajarri Yamaji as the traditional owners of the MRO site.

Explore further: ASKAP telescope to rule radio-burst hunt

More information: R. M. Shannon et al, The dispersion–brightness relation for fast radio bursts from a wide-field survey, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0588-y

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Surveillance_Egg_Unit
2 / 5 (4) Oct 10, 2018

"Using the new technology of the Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), we've also proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood."
Co-author Dr. Jean-Pierre Macquart, from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), said bursts travel for billions of years and occasionally pass through clouds of gas."

But due to the fact that the Milky Way galaxy is traveling also with reference to the other side of the Universe, from/in which direction is the other side of the Universe? Above? Below the MW? Straight ahead or behind us?
philecrawford
1 / 5 (2) Oct 11, 2018
What if FRBs are the wake of an alien Alcubierre drive technology?
granville583762
3 / 5 (6) Oct 11, 2018
Highly polarized hot plasma magnetic field gigahertz waves

FRBs named by YYMMDD, first burst described FRB 010724 by Parkes Observatory mostly FRBs found in recorded data. 19 January 2015, a FRB observed live, by Parkes Observatory.
FRB, high-energy astrophysical phenomenon of unknown origin, as transients gigahertz radio pulses lasting milliseconds, discovered by Duncan Lorimer and student David Narkevic in 2007 looking through recorded by the Parkes Observatory on 24 July 2001 archival pulsar survey data, of uncertain origin and extragalactic origin.
FRB 121102 waves are highly polarized, having formed when passing through hot plasma with an extremely strong magnetic field https://en.wikipe...B_121102

Galactic of origin, in relative terms as we are the other side of the vacuum, why are they coming from the other "opposite" side of the vacuum?
torbjorn_b_g_larsson
4 / 5 (4) Oct 11, 2018

"Using the new technology of the Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), we've also proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood."
Co-author Dr. Jean-Pierre Macquart, from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), said bursts travel for billions of years and occasionally pass through clouds of gas."

But due to the fact that the Milky Way galaxy is traveling also with reference to the other side of the Universe, from/in which direction is the other side of the Universe? Above? Below the MW? Straight ahead or behind us?


It is in the article, and as expected from remote sources: "Fast radio bursts come from all over the sky".
Anonym262722
1 / 5 (2) Oct 11, 2018
@SEU "from/in which direction is the other side of the Universe?"

According to Suntola decelerating DU, the emitting sources started at the optical distance R4= 13800 - (280 through 3700) M l.y of the present receival time 9.2 B yrs of global (absolute)Newtonian time concept. You may want to calculate the corresponding values of the expansion speed C4 of R4 and emittal time T4 for the distant 3.7B l.y source to check the claim of emittal energy level of 80 yrs of Sun energy production (similar to the cause of SN1a mistaken DE 'confirmation' and accelerated vs. decelerating expansion). For instance, if C4_past=2 C_today we get R4_past=R4_today/4 and T4_past=T4_today/8, F4=1/T4.
Anonym262722
not rated yet Nov 06, 2018
Correction: The optical distance of the emitting sources was 280-3700 M ly or the difference of R4 at the receival and emitting times. An optical distance (13800-280) M ly is for an emitting source at R4=280 M ly received at today's value of R4=13.8 B ly where R4 is the 4- (Hubble) radius of Riemann sphere in the direction of 3-D space expansion at the decelerating speed C=C4. The idea of DU continually balances the opposite motion/gravitational components of energized total mass M in the closed energy system. This 'energy vs. force field equation' can be derived using middle school calculus. Its solution of scalar nonlinear functions connects C4=C with R4 and dynamic Newtonian time T4 and its F4 frequency of atomic processes (such as ticking and decay rates). Decelerating F4 expands the local second at the same amount as C=C4 decelerates so the locally observable C appears constant. This fooled starting postulates of GR/QM including their mistaken DE, BB and GW 'proofs'.

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