NASA's GPM finds Beryl's remnants raining on the Bahamas

July 11, 2018, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
The GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall being generated from Beryl's remnants on July 11 at 8:31 a.m. EDT (1231 UTC). GPM found two areas of heavy rain in the Bahamas where rain was falling at more than 1.6 inches per hour (white). Credit: NASA/JAXA/NRL

The remnant thunderstorms from former Tropical Storm Beryl were bringing some areas of heavy rain to the Bahamas when the GPM satellite passed overhead.

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall being generated from Beryl's remnants on July 11 at 8:31 a.m. EDT (1231 UTC). GPM found two areas of heavy rain where rain was falling at more than 1.6 inches per hour. When GPM passed overhead, Crooked Island was experiencing the heaviest rainfall. The other area of heavy was over the Atlantic Ocean, northeast of Crooked Island.

GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency known as JAXA.

On July 11 at 8 a.m. EDT, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said that the large area of cloudiness and disorganized thunderstorms associated with the remnants of Beryl was located over much of the Bahamas and extends northwestward over the western Atlantic for a few hundred miles.

NHC expects little or no development today, July 11, but conditions could become a little more favorable later in the week while the disturbance moves slowly northward over the western Atlantic.

Explore further: GPM satellite obtains excellent views of Beryl's remnants

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