Image: NASA satellite image shows lava flow from Hawaii volcano

July 27, 2018, NASA
Lava from Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano flowing to the Pacific Ocean, imaged July 25 by NASA's Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) instrument. Vegetation shown in red, clouds in white and lava in yellow. Credit: NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems/U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

New NASA satellite imagery captured a hot lava flow from fissure 8 of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. The flow from fissure 8 extends from the Leilani Estates to the Pacific Ocean—with main ocean entry points near Ahalanui.

The imagery, from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) radiometer instrument on NASA's Terra satellite, was taken on Wednesday, July 25. Vegetation is shown in red, and clouds are white. The hot lava flows detected by ASTER's thermal infrared channels are overlaid in yellow. The image covers an area of 9.5 by 11.5 miles (15.3 by 18.6 kilometers).

Fissure 8 is one of the most active fissures of many that have broken ground since Kilauea began erupting in early May. Flying debris from the explosive interaction between lava and water is a serious hazard near ocean entry points. The interaction also creates laze—plumes laden with and volcanic particles—that can irritate the eyes, lungs and skin.

Kilauea is one of the world's most active volcanoes. It is the youngest and southeastern-most volcano on the Island of Hawaii.

Explore further: NASA Satellite detects Kilauea fissures

Related Stories

NASA Satellite detects Kilauea fissures

May 8, 2018

The eruption of Kilauea Volcano on the island of Hawaii triggered a number of gas- and lava-oozing fissures in the East Riff Zone of the volcano. The fissures and high levels of sulfur dioxide gas prompted evacuations in ...

Is there a new volcano on Hawaii?

June 27, 2018

Kilauea, the most active volcano on Hawaii, has been in continual eruption since 1983. It entered a new phase in early May when fractures along a rift on the eastern side of the volcano opened during a series of earthquakes ...

Recommended for you

Fish give up the fight after coral bleaching

October 22, 2018

Researchers found that when water temperatures heat up for corals, fish 'tempers' cool down, providing the first clear evidence of coral bleaching serving as a trigger for rapid change in reef fish behaviour.

Evidence of earliest life on Earth disputed

October 17, 2018

When Australian scientists presented evidence in 2016 of life on Earth 3.7 billon years ago—pushing the record back 220 million years—it was a big deal, influencing even the search for life on Mars.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.