Denver Zoo celebrates birth of Sumatran orangutan

March 31, 2018

The Denver Zoo is welcoming a baby Sumatran orangutan who is named after an Indonesian word that means "bright" and is often used to refer to sunshine.

The female primate named Cerah (Che-rah) was born Sunday to parents Nias and Berani, and the family is bonding away from public view.

Cerah should make her debut within the next two weeks in the Great Apes exhibit in Primate Panorama.

She was conceived within a month of 29-year-old Nias and 25-year-old Berani getting set up in July.

Zoo officials say Sumatran orangutans are critically endangered with a worldwide population of only about 14,600. Habitat loss is a major reason their population is declining.

Explore further: Group: Orangutan orphans a sign of habitat destruction

Related Stories

Group: Orangutan orphans a sign of habitat destruction

October 16, 2017

The discovery last week of two orphaned baby orangutans on Borneo is further evidence that deforestation and illegal hunting are threatening survival of the great apes, an Indonesian conservation group said Monday.

Rare albino orangutan rescued on Borneo island

May 2, 2017

A rare albino orangutan has been rescued on the Indonesian part of Borneo island where villagers were keeping the white-haired, blue-eyed creature in a cage, a protection group said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Can China keep it's climate promises?

March 26, 2019

China can easily meet its Paris climate pledge to peak its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, but sourcing 20 percent of its energy needs from renewables and nuclear power by that date may be considerably harder, researchers ...

What happened before the Big Bang?

March 26, 2019

A team of scientists has proposed a powerful new test for inflation, the theory that the universe dramatically expanded in size in a fleeting fraction of a second right after the Big Bang. Their goal is to give insight into ...

Cellular microRNA detection with miRacles

March 26, 2019

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding regulatory RNAs that can repress gene expression post-transcriptionally and are therefore increasingly used as biomarkers of disease. Detecting miRNAs can be arduous and expensive as ...

In the Tree of Life, youth has its advantages

March 26, 2019

It's a question that has captivated naturalists for centuries: Why have some groups of organisms enjoyed incredibly diversity—like fish, birds, insects—while others have contained only a few species—like humans.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.