NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta soaking Mauritius and Reunion Island

January 18, 2018, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
On Jan. 18 at 1:30 a.m. local time, the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite saw Berguitta blanketing both Reunion and Mauritius islands. The center of circulation appeared just south of Mauritius. Credit: NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team

NASA found heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Berguitta as it closed in on Mauritius and Reunion Islands.

On Jan. 18, NASA's Terra satellite captured an early morning visible image that showed the center of the storm just south of Mauritius and the storm blanketing both islands.

Warnings were in effect for both islands. A tropical cyclone alert class 3 is in effect for Mauritius and La Reunion is on Orange Alert.

On Jan. 16, GPM 3-D scans through eastern side of Tropical Cyclone Berguitta showed that a few storm tops northeast of Mauritius were reaching heights greater than 13 km (8.1 miles). Storm tops that high indicate powerful uplift in a storm. Powerful storms northeast of Mauritius were dropping rain at a rate greater than 54 mm (2.1 inches) per hour. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce
On Jan. 16, GPM 3-D scans through eastern side of Tropical Cyclone Berguitta showed that a few storm tops northeast of Mauritius were reaching heights greater than 13 km (8.1 miles). Storm tops that high indicate powerful uplift in a storm. Powerful storms northeast of Mauritius were dropping rain at a rate greater than 54 mm (2.1 inches) per hour. Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce

Explore further: NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta heading toward Mauritius

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