Video: How will climate change impact ocean health?

September 22, 2017

The oceans provide one quarter of the world's dietary protein, yet we have little understanding of how changes in ocean temperatures and chemistry will impact ocean life, from microbes to coral reefs to commercial fish stocks, and threaten marine food security.

Research by Center for Climate and Life ocean scientists builds understanding of how ocean ecosystems, productivity, and genetic diversity will respond to climate change. In this video, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory's Hugh Ducklow, Sonya Dyhrman, and Bärbel Hönisch explain what they're learning about the ocean's changing conditions. Their discoveries will contribute to the sustainable management and conservation of marine resources, and help ensure sufficient and nutritious food for present and future generations.

Credit: Columbia University

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michael_frishberg
not rated yet Sep 22, 2017
In evolutionary terms, humans ate very little protein from the open ocean. Wonder why we think we can 'harvest' fisheries at all. Every open ocean fish we eat means something else that relied on those fish can't eat.

We've destroyed half the life in the ocean (biomass not species) in 60 years. How much will be left, now that human population will be greater still over the next 60 years?

vhemt.org - we've ALREADY destroyed the planet's ability to support human life, and, since technology is to blame, trying to develop more technology to counteract our impacts will only hasten the end...

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