Image: Voyager 1 Launches aboard Titan III/Centaur

September 6, 2017, NASA
Credit: NASA

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft launched atop its Titan/Centaur-6 launch vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex in Florida on September 5, 1977, at 8:56 a.m. local time.

The twin Voyager 1 and 2 are still operating and traveling where no spacecraft – or anything touched by humanity – has gone before.

As we celebrate the of the Voyager 1 launch, we reflect on the vision that inspired the mission, its greatest achievements, and its enduring legacy.

Explore further: NASA: let's say something to Voyager 1 on 40th anniversary of launch

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