Image: Landslide on the radar

June 14, 2017
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2015–17), processed by Norut

On 20 May, over a million tonnes of dirt and rock buried part of California's Highway 1 along the Pacific coastline in the state's Big Sur region. In addition to cutting off the route, the landslide added some 5 hectares of land to the shoreline.

Sentinel-1's radar shows that the ground that slid down the mountain was moving in the two years before the .

The were processed using Small Baseline Subset interferometry (SBAS), a technique that can detect and monitor movements over wide areas with high sensitivity. In this image, red dots represent points where the ground was moving away from the satellite at a rate of more than 70 mm per year. Green dots show stable ground in the surrounding area.

Explore further: Image: Sentinel-1 sees Mocoa landslide

Related Stories

Image: Sentinel-1 sees Mocoa landslide

April 5, 2017

Sentinel-1 radar coverage from before and after the 1 April 2017 mudslide in Mocoa, Colombia, shows the extent of movement of the disaster that claimed over 260 lives, injured hundreds more and left scores displaced.

Slight surface movements on the radar

March 24, 2015

Scientists are making advances in the use of satellite radar data – such as those from the Sentinel-1 mission – to monitor Earth's changing surface.

Fogo volcano on Sentinel's radar

December 3, 2014

Radar images from the Sentinel-1A satellite are helping to monitor ground movements of the recently erupted Fogo volcano.

Sentinel-1 poised to monitor motion

August 27, 2014

Although it was only launched a few months ago and is still being commissioned, the new Sentinel-1A radar satellite has already shown that it can be used to generate 3D models of Earth's surface and will be able to closely ...

Recommended for you

Carbon coating gives biochar its garden-greening power

October 20, 2017

For more than 100 years, biochar, a carbon-rich, charcoal-like substance made from oxygen-deprived plant or other organic matter, has both delighted and puzzled scientists. As a soil additive, biochar can store carbon and ...

Cool roofs have water saving benefits too

October 20, 2017

The energy and climate benefits of cool roofs have been well established: By reflecting rather than absorbing the sun's energy, light-colored roofs keep buildings, cities, and even the entire planet cooler. Now a new study ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.