Siberian tiger that terrified Vladivostok gets new wild home

May 18, 2017
In this image made from video released by Amur Tiger Centre/WWF, a male Amur tiger is seen before being released into the wild in Bikin National Park in southeastern Russia, Monday, May 15, 2017. A Siberian tiger that terrorized Russia's Far East city of Vladivostok by prowling its suburbs has been relocated to a vast, wild Russian national park where officials hope he will thrive. The tiger, nicknamed Vladik, was captured last October on the edge of Vladivostok. He was helicoptered Monday to Bikin National Park, 500 kilometers (350 miles) further north. (Amur Tiger Centre/WWF via AP)

A Siberian tiger that terrorized Russia's Far East city of Vladivostok by prowling its suburbs has been relocated to a vast Russian national park where officials hope he will thrive.

The tiger, nicknamed Vladik, was captured in October on the edge of Vladivostok. He flown by helicopter Monday to Bikin National Park, 500 kilometers (350 miles) further north.

Russia has declared Siberian, or Amur, tigers a protected species. Only about 540 are estimated to live in the wild.

World Wildlife Fund video shows the tiger appearing initially bewildered when his cage was opened. But he then leapt out with a growl, ran around the space where the helicopter landed and disappeared into the woods.

Pavel Fomenko of WWF says Vladik "has little chance of wandering into urban jungles again."

In this image made from video released by Amur Tiger Centre/WWF, a male Amur tiger is seen after being released into the wild in Bikin National Park in southeastern Russia, Monday, May 15, 2017. A Siberian tiger that terrorized Russia's Far East city of Vladivostok by prowling its suburbs has been relocated to a vast, wild Russian national park where officials hope he will thrive. The tiger, nicknamed Vladik, was captured last October on the edge of Vladivostok. He was helicoptered Monday to Bikin National Park, 500 kilometers (350 miles) further north. (Amur Tiger Centre/WWF via AP)

Explore further: Wild Thai tiger cub footage sparks hope for endangered species

Related Stories

Escaped Siberian tiger shot dead in East China park

December 27, 2011

A rare Siberian tiger escaped from an east China zoo, frightening locals in a downtown public park before she was shot dead by more than 12 police, the official Xinhua news agency said on Tuesday.

Asian building boom threatens tigers, study says

November 23, 2016

Poaching and habitat loss have devastated tiger populations but in the coming years, the new threat of infrastructure projects could pose the biggest risk to the imperilled cats, a report said Wednesday.

Scientists track Siberian tiger cubs

October 26, 2005

U.S. Wildlife Conservation Society researchers and their Russian colleagues have fitted three 40-day-old Siberian tiger cubs with radio tracking collars.

Shar Pei nurses 2 endangered tiger cubs in Russia

June 6, 2012

(AP) — Two Siberian tiger cubs abandoned in Russia by their mother have found an unusual wet nurse — a wrinkled, sand-colored Shar Pei dog named Cleopatra, a zoo worker said Wednesday.

Report shows dramatic decline in Siberian tigers

November 24, 2009

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today a report revealing that the last remaining population of Siberian tigers has likely declined significantly due to the rising tide of poaching and habitat loss.

Recommended for you

How human brains became so big

May 23, 2018

The human brain is disproportionately large. And while abundant grey matter confers certain intellectual advantages, sustaining a big brain is costly—consuming a fifth of energy in the human body.

Rehabilitating lactate: From poison to cure

May 23, 2018

George Brooks has been trying to reshape thinking about lactate—in the lab, the clinic and on the training field—for more than 40 years, and finally, it seems, people are listening. Lactate, it's becoming clear, is not ...

Chimpanzee calls differ according to context

May 23, 2018

An important question in the evolution of language is what caused animal calls to diversify and to encode different information. A team of scientists led by Catherine Crockford of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary ...

How a cell knows when to divide

May 23, 2018

How does a cell know when to divide? We know that hundreds of genes contribute to a wave of activity linked to cell division, but to generate that wave new research shows that cells must first grow large enough to produce ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.