Ancient Rome treasures discovered during subway dig on show

April 8, 2017
Ancient Roman pottery is on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

The long-delayed project to extend Rome's subway system has brought treasures of the past to the surface and allowed them to be showcased at one of the city's new subway stations.

Rome city officials this week unveiled the Metro C archaeological exhibit, which features amphora, marble panels, coins and even peach pits dating back to the Roman era.

The permanent exhibit will be on view as passengers descend into the three-story San Giovanni subway station, which is expected to open in 2018.

"For those who will use this metro—this station in particular—it's a full immersion into the history of Rome and of this site," said archaeologist Rossella Rea, who is in charge of the dig for the Italian government.

Archaeologists said their surveys, which reached an unusually deep 20 meters (yards), indicated the site was once a huge farm. Peach pits, seashells and other organic remains have been found intact and are featured in the exhibit.

Lines on the southeastern section of Metro C have been operational since 2015, while northern lines near the city center are still under construction. The project has been delayed for years by the repeated discovery of ancient underground treasures.

Ancient Roman artifacts are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

An ancient Roman low relief with figures of Maenads dated between the first century B.C. and the first century A.D. are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman artifacts are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman artifacts are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman artifacts is on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman copper, bronze and silver coins dated from the third century B.C. are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman amphoras are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
An ancient Roman ante-fix decorated with a low relief image of Silenus dated to the first century B.C. is on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman baked clay tubes and lead pipes dated from the first century B.C. are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman plates are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Ancient Roman organic finds from the early and middle imperial period are on display in the San Giovanni underground station of Rome's brand new third metro line, Thursday, April 6, 2017. The metro station, set to open early next year, will double up as museum, boasting a display of archaeological remains brought to the surface during the new line's excavation, that passengers will admire as they head to their trains. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Explore further: Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground

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rgw
5 / 5 (2) Apr 09, 2017
"an ancient Roman ante-fix decorated with a low relief image of Silenus dated to the first century D.C..."

Are you sure that this was not dated to the 3rd Century AC?

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