Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground

Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
An archeologist checks human bones as ancient roman ruins of former barracks were discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Work to upgrade Rome's public transport has again run up against an ancient problem: archaeological ruins.

Culture ministry officials on Monday showed reporters where work on the city's third subway line unearthed barracks for Roman Praetorian guards dating from the second century.

While construction workers poured concrete at the planned Amba Aradam metro stop, an archaeologist just a few meters away brushed dirt from a small bronze bracelet.

The barracks, discovered nine meters (about 30 feet) below street level, cover 900 square meters (9600 square feet) and include a long hallway and 39 rooms decorated with black-and-white mosaics on the floors and frescoed walls.

"It's exceptional, not only for its good state of conservation but because it is part of a neighborhood which already included four barracks," said Rossella Rea of the Culture Ministry. "And therefore, we can characterize this area as a military neighborhood."

Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
A view of ancient roman ruins discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Archaeologists have also found a collective grave at the barracks, where they have so far discovered 13 adult skeletons along with a bronze coin and a bronze bracelet.

Officials hope to incorporate the discovery into the new metro station, which is scheduled to open in 2020. Work on Rome's Metro Line C has been beset by delays due to corruption probes and funding shortages since launching in 2007.

  • Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
    An archeologist checks ancient roman ruins discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
  • Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
    Media visit the site where ancient roman ruins were discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
  • Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
    A view of ancient roman ruins discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
  • Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
    A view of ancient roman ruins and mosaics discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
  • Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
    A view of ancient roman ruins and mosaics discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)
  • Rome metro line runs into Roman barracks and burial ground
    A view of ancient roman ruins discovered during work on a new underground line, in Rome, Monday, May 16, 2016. Work on the Metro C being built through the center of Rome has once again run into ancient roman ruins, this time the barracks for the Roman Praetorian guards dating back to the period of Emperor Hadrian, in the second century A.D. Officials say the barracks cover 900 square meters, and include a 100 meter hallway with 39 rooms. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

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May 23, 2016
I wonder how they can do any earthworks in Rome at all. If you've ever been to the city you'll know that it is chock full of archaeological/culturally important sites. If you haven't it should be first on your list when you visit the rteagion.

May 23, 2016
...so why is a pile of shit buried under 50 feet of dirt suddenly become so important, simply on the basis of some people blundering into it with an excavator?
Should we only pay attention to those sites where our ancestors left a big sign 2000-3000 years ago stating "Cultural/Historically Significant Stuff"?

May 23, 2016
"On this spot 3,000 years ago nothing happened."

May 24, 2016
Rome is traditionally believed to have been found in the year 2769...
Phys, just because you're from the future does mean we appreciate your bragging about it.

May 24, 2016
Rome is traditionally believed to have been found in the year 2769...
Phys, just because you're from the future does mean we appreciate your bragging about it.


I think he was meaning 2769 years ago from now. According to the legends it was founded in 753 BC.

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