Former NASA mathematician, 98, gets her moment at Oscars

Former NASA mathematician, 98, gets her moment at Oscars
Janelle Monae, left, Taraji P. Henson, second right and Octavia Spencer, right, introduce Katherine Johnson, seated, the inspiration for "Hidden Figures," as they present the award for best documentary feature at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

She said only "thank you," but it was one of the more moving moments of Sunday's Oscars ceremony.

Katherine Johnson, 98, the former NASA mathematician played by Taraji P. Henson in the movie "Hidden Figures," was brought on stage to thunderous applause.

She was introduced by Henson, Janelle Monae and Octavia Spencer, who all star in the film as female black mathematicians who helped put NASA ahead in the against the Soviet Union.

"Hidden Figures" was nominated for best picture.

The 98-year-old Johnson wore a blue dress and was brought out in a wheelchair during Sunday's ceremony.

Former NASA mathematician, 98, gets her moment at Oscars
Janelle Monae, left, Taraji P. Henson, second right and Octavia Spencer, right, introduce Katherine Johnson, seated, the inspiration for "Hidden Figures," as they present the award for best documentary feature at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)

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Mar 06, 2017
Great movie! So good to see people manage to set aside their petty differences and develop empathy to move things forward. By the end of the movie our understanding of space science, our technology and our appreciation for each other was dramatically improved. This should resonate particularly well with Star Trek fans, it sure did with me.

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