Researchers stress the need for research on Ebola virus disease in great apes

December 5, 2016
A new review examines the current knowledge about EVD in great apes and documents the link between outbreaks in apes and in humans, mainly via bushmeat consumption. Credit: Mammal Review

Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a threat to human health, but it also threatens the survival of African great apes. A new review examines the current knowledge about EVD in great apes and documents the link between outbreaks in apes and in humans, mainly via bushmeat consumption.

The review's authors note that vaccination of wild apes would simultaneously reduce the risk of transmission into the human population and the impact of EVD on the endangered great apes.

"Even though theoretically this may sound like a great plan, the elusive nature of great apes, living in dense tropical rainforests, raises serious questions about its feasibility " said Dr. Fabian Leendertz, senior author of the Mammal Review article.

Additional research, systematic wildlife surveillance, and public education about the risk of bushmeat consumption are needed.

Explore further: Ebola virus has wiped out a third of the population of chimps and gorillas

More information: Siv Aina J. Leendertz et al, Ebola in great apes - current knowledge, possibilities for vaccination, and implications for conservation and human health, Mammal Review (2016). DOI: 10.1111/mam.12082

Related Stories

Common human viruses threaten endangered great apes

January 25, 2008

Common human viruses are responsible for outbreaks of respiratory disease that have led to the decline of endangered chimpanzees in the wild, according to a study reported online on January 24th in Current Biology.

Treaty: last chance to save great apes

September 12, 2005

A treaty signed during the weekend in the Democratic Republic of Congo reportedly might be the world's last chance to save great apes from extinction.

Recommended for you

Tasmanian tiger doomed long before humans came along

December 12, 2017

The Tasmanian tiger was doomed long before humans began hunting the enigmatic marsupial, scientists said Tuesday, with DNA sequencing showing it was in poor genetic health for thousands of years before its extinction.

Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet tooth

December 11, 2017

Although the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study from researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine addresses this ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.