Astronomers find supercluster of galaxies near Milky Way

December 21, 2016
The white/blue image is the Milky Way, with the central bulge on the left and the plane of the disk running horizontally across the region; the yellow/green dots are the distribution of galaxies in the nearby universe; the Vela supercluster (VSC) region is indicated, running across the Galactic plane; also shown is the location of the Shapley supercluster (SC), the other massive structure in the nearby universe. Credit: Australian National University

The Australian National University (ANU) is part of an international team of astronomers that found one of the Universe's biggest superclusters of galaxies near the Milky Way.

Professor Matthew Colless from ANU said the Vela supercluster, which had previously gone undetected as it was hidden by stars and dust in the Milky Way, was a huge mass that influenced the motion of our Galaxy.

"This is one of the biggest concentrations of galaxies in the Universe - possibly the biggest in the neighbourhood of our Galaxy, but that will need to be confirmed by further study," said Professor Colless from the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

"The gravity of the Vela supercluster may explain the difference between the measured motion of the Milky Way through space and the motion predicted from the distribution of previously mapped galaxies."

Professor Colless used the Anglo-Australian Telescope to measure distances for many to confirm earlier predictions that Vela was a supercluster. He also helped to estimate the supercluster's effect on the motion of the Milky Way.

The research involved astronomers based in South Africa, Australia and Europe. Two new Australian surveys starting in 2017 will confirm the size of the Vela supercluster.

"The Taipan optical survey will measure galaxy distances over a bigger area around Vela, while the WALLABY radio survey will be able to peer through the densest parts of the Milky Way into the supercluster's heart," Professor Colless said.

The research is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Explore further: Team discovers major supercluster of galaxies hidden by Milky Way

More information: Renée C. Kraan-Korteweg et al, Discovery of a supercluster in the Zone of Avoidance in Vela, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters (2017). DOI: 10.1093/mnrasl/slw229

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16 comments

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Benni
1.9 / 5 (9) Dec 21, 2016
"The gravity of the Vela supercluster may explain the difference between the measured motion of the Milky Way through space and the motion predicted from the distribution of previously mapped galaxies."


It's come to the point where there's no longer any need for hypothetically disproving the existence of a Universe composed of 80-95% Dark Matter, these continuing instrumentation improvements are rapidly doing a credible job of locating all the INFERRED GRAVITY once considered to be the exclusive domain for DM.
RNP
4.2 / 5 (10) Dec 21, 2016
An open access copy of the paper can be found here: https://arxiv.org...4615.pdf

@Benni
This has NOTHING to do with dark matter. You are confusing things again.
antialias_physorg
4.1 / 5 (9) Dec 21, 2016
Benni, would you mind reading articles before posting? It's sorta cute the way you manage to be wrong about every single thing...ever.
But when you start to post about stuff that isn't part of the article you're just making even more a fool of yourself than usual (and wasting valuable electricity/bandwith).
Benni
1.9 / 5 (9) Dec 21, 2016
An open access copy of the paper can be found here: https://arxiv.org...4615.pdf

@Benni
This has NOTHING to do with dark matter. You are confusing things again.


Yep, that's what I keep telling confused people like you Phys1, that all the INFERRED GRAVITY narratives of DM Enthusiasts continue falling to new discoveries of once unknown visible baryonic matter.
RNP
4.3 / 5 (6) Dec 21, 2016
@Benni
LEARN SOME ASTROPHYSICS. You will only continue to make a fool of yourself here if you do not. In fact, superclusters, such as the one reported here, have one of the strongest and most easily detectable dark matter signatures.
Benni
1 / 5 (4) Dec 21, 2016
@Benni
In fact, superclusters, such as the one reported here, have one of the strongest and most easily detectable dark matter signatures.


"signatures" eh Phys1? That's plural, more than one.........OK, list a few.

Tuxford
1 / 5 (7) Dec 21, 2016
Hey guys. This is off topic, but I am not used to NOT being marked down, or rebutted by the merger maniacs residing herein, but this story seems to have been hidden from view by the owner of this site, the NSA.

http://phys.org/n...ies.html

When you scroll the the Astronomy sub-section, this story does not appear chronologically. No wonder my comments have been ignored. Was starting to feel a bit lonely. LOL!

Guess the overseers are uncomfortable with this story. They should be! So easy to hide, just don't list it! So after they saw my comment, it was delisted. And you guys are deprived from the self-satisfying mark downs. Come on punks, mark me down!
Enthusiastic Fool
4 / 5 (4) Dec 21, 2016
Tux you're very weird. I think mainstream cosmology has been aware of a relationship between the sizes of central black holes and their host galaxy. Simple googling shows me papers from 2002 where this is mentioned making your 2011 "prediction" late. Your prediction is also about core stars which have not been observed. The engines of material creation you cling to seem to violate basic conservation and common sense. In regards to your first post about core stars being left bare 6 years ago I can find papers about SMBH and galaxy quenching from 2008. You have yet to make a meaningful prediction of anything.
http://adsabs.har...0111418W
http://iopscience...6/589551
Neither of these papers read like they've come up with these concepts themselves so I'm sure they predate this. Ultimately its not worth going back and 1 starring you.

In regards to this article I read this in Nov and the related links agree. Different papers though.
RNP
3.7 / 5 (3) Dec 22, 2016
@Benni
@Benni
In fact, superclusters, such as the one reported here, have one of the strongest and most easily detectable dark matter signatures.


"signatures" eh Phys1? That's plural, more than one.........OK, list a few.


Let me see if I have this right. You have repeatedly expressed very strong opinions about dark matter. Now you are saying that you do not know what the actual evidence for its existence is? Do you not see that this completely undermines your arguments? Nevertheless, there are a few of the most easily understood signatures:

The rotation curves of disk galaxies.
The stellar velocity dispersions of early-type galaxies.
The orbital speeds of satellite galaxies.
The velocity dispersion of galaxies in clusters and superclusters.

There are others.
RNP
4.2 / 5 (5) Dec 22, 2016
Hey guys. This is off topic, but I am not used to NOT being marked down, or rebutted by the merger maniacs residing herein, but this story seems to have been hidden from view by the owner of this site, the NSA.

http://phys.org/n...ies.html

When you scroll the the Astronomy sub-section, this story does not appear chronologically. No wonder my comments have been ignored. Was starting to feel a bit lonely. LOL!

Guess the overseers are uncomfortable with this story. They should be! So easy to hide, just don't list it! So after they saw my comment, it was delisted. And you guys are deprived from the self-satisfying mark downs. Come on punks, mark me down!


The article was not hidden. I have seen your silly comments therein. I can not speak for others, but, personally, I felt your comments were best just ignored, although I will go and down-vote them if you want me too.
Benni
1 / 5 (3) Dec 22, 2016
@Benni
In fact, superclusters, such as the one reported here, have one of the strongest and most easily detectable dark matter signatures


"signatures" eh Phys1? That's plural, more than one....OK, list a few.


Do you not see that this completely undermines your arguments? Nevertheless, there are a few of the most easily understood signatures:


rotation curves of disk galaxies
you know this from looking in a mirror, right?

stellar velocity dispersions of early-type galaxies
lala land MIA

orbital speeds of satellite galaxies.
how about our Sun's satellites?

velocity dispersion of galaxies in clusters and superclusters.


....and I was looking for you to come up with a test tube of EVIDENCE or a Spectrograph of something known to exist.

You know Rguy, there is a greater quantity of EVIDENCE that your above listed SIGNATURES are actually signatures of something that has been proven to exist, visible MASS.

Benni
1 / 5 (2) Dec 22, 2016
The rotation curves of disk galaxies.
The stellar velocity dispersions of early-type galaxies.
The orbital speeds of satellite galaxies.
The velocity dispersion of galaxies in clusters and superclusters.


So explain it to this Nuclear/Electrical Engineer in terms that can be scientifically quantified, why it is that nothing in your above list are not "signatures" of Visible Matter? In our lab we don't look at a WALL in the lab & consider that a SIGNATURE of anything other than the fact the WALL exists. We look at Spectrographs as characteristic of known materials, not as INFERRED fantasies.

So, you got more signatures do you Phys1? OK, put up more of your TinFoil Hat entertainment.
RNP
4.2 / 5 (5) Dec 22, 2016
@Benni
So explain it to this Nuclear/Electrical Engineer in terms that can be scientifically quantified, why it is that nothing in your above list are not "signatures" of Visible Matter?


Sorry, but as you say (claim), you are only an engineer and I think this stuff is far too complicated for you. Besides, in a recent thread ( http://phys.org/n...ity.html ), I gave you info linking to 22 serious, peer reviewed papers, published in a top-notch journal (MNRAS). Your response was to simply dismiss them out-of-hand saying they were "handpicked", without even having looked at any of them as far as I could tell. This despite the fact that you were not being to present a SINGLE contra-example, despite repeated requests.

It is therefore apparent that scientific discussions are beyond you. I am therefore not going to waste any more time on this. If you want to understand go and Google the above topics.
Benni
1 / 5 (2) Dec 22, 2016
@Benni

So explain it to this Nuclear/Electrical Engineer in terms that can be scientifically quantified, why it is that nothing in your above list are not "signatures" of Visible Matter?


Sorry, but as you say, you are an engineer and I think this stuff is far too complicated for you
and all you are is a self-proclaimed journalist who wouldn't recognize a Differential Equation if you saw one.

This despite the fact that you were not being to present a SINGLE contra-example, despite repeated requests.
Only a journalist could write something this incoherent.

It is therefore apparent that scientific discussions are beyond you
Coming from someone who has repeatedly come here & quoted the Inverse Square Law backwards from the known laws of Physics.

Hey, Rguy, do you know that the force of gravity at the center of any stellar mass is an unequivocal ZERO? Yes or No? Won't answer the question will you? You never have in the past, why start now.
Benni
1 / 5 (1) Dec 22, 2016
The rotation curves of disk galaxies.
The stellar velocity dispersions of early-type galaxies.
The orbital speeds of satellite galaxies.
The velocity dispersion of galaxies in clusters and superclusters.

There are others.


Above, The Laws of Inference, a Journalist's guide to the laws of Physics, brought to you by one advocating a repeal of the Inverse Square Law, Rguy.
Tuxford
1 / 5 (1) Dec 23, 2016
Hey guys. This is off topic, but I am not used to NOT being marked down, or rebutted by the merger maniacs residing herein, but this story seems to have been hidden from view by the owner of this site, the NSA.

http://phys.org/n...ies.html

When you scroll the the Astronomy sub-section, this story does not appear chronologically. No wonder my comments have been ignored. Was starting to feel a bit lonely. LOL!

Guess the overseers are uncomfortable with this story. They should be! So easy to hide, just don't list it! So after they saw my comment, it was delisted. And you guys are deprived from the self-satisfying mark downs. Come on punks, mark me down!


Hmm, I am still not marked down in this story. Guess the bots can't find the de-listed story to make their mark!

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