Getting the collar: Researchers tracking Florida black bears

September 30, 2016

State researchers are using radio collars to track the movement of 16 female black bears living in or near a state forest in the Florida Panhandle.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said Thursday researchers recently placed the collars on the bears which will periodically report their location. Wildlife officials said the collars will eventually fall off the bears.

Citing the growing bear population, in 2015 authorized the state's first bear hunt in 21 years. A total of 304 bears were killed last October. But the commission voted in June to hold off on any future hunts until more information could be gathered.

Researchers also plan to visit winter dens used by bears to see how many cubs there are. They also will place collars on the cubs to see how many survive their first year.

Explore further: Nearly 300 bears killed in controversial Florida hunt

Related Stories

Kodiak bears track salmon runs in Alaska

June 1, 2016

A University of Montana graduate student's research on Alaskan brown bears and red salmon is the May cover story of the high-profile journal Ecology.

Pa. bear hunt may set record

November 18, 2005

Pennsylvania Game Commission officials said this year's black bear season, which opens Monday, is likely to produce some exceptionally large bears.

Recommended for you

Nanoscale Lamb wave-driven motors in nonliquid environments

March 19, 2019

Light driven movement is challenging in nonliquid environments as micro-sized objects can experience strong dry adhesion to contact surfaces and resist movement. In a recent study, Jinsheng Lu and co-workers at the College ...

OSIRIS-REx reveals asteroid Bennu has big surprises

March 19, 2019

A NASA spacecraft that will return a sample of a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to Earth in 2023 made the first-ever close-up observations of particle plumes erupting from an asteroid's surface. Bennu also revealed itself ...

The powerful meteor that no one saw (except satellites)

March 19, 2019

At precisely 11:48 am on December 18, 2018, a large space rock heading straight for Earth at a speed of 19 miles per second exploded into a vast ball of fire as it entered the atmosphere, 15.9 miles above the Bering Sea.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.