Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife

Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
Caracal. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera

A camera trap survey in one of Africa's largest conservation landscapes has captured an exciting range of species – from honey badgers and caracals to a hyena holding an elephant's trunk…

Situated in a region where five African countries converge, Kavango Zambezi (KAZA) Transfrontier Conservation Area, is the largest of its kind in the world. Despite its enormous strategic importance for African biodiversity, relatively little is known about the presence, abundance and distribution of key species within the Angola section of KAZA.

With support from the Conservation Leadership Programme (CLP), one team of 2016 award-winners is working to bridge that by compiling a wildlife inventory with the aid of carefully located .

Initial results have been, to say the least, exciting. Here is a snapshot of some of the spectacular wildlife (including threatened species) that has already been captured on film.

  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    Honey badgers. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    Hyena and elephant trunk. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    African lion. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    Zorilla. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    African wild dog. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    Bat-eared fox. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    Porcupine. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera
  • Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife
    African elephants. Credit: INBAC/CLP/Panthera

Citation: Camera traps reveal extraordinary wildlife (2016, September 23) retrieved 15 June 2024 from https://phys.org/news/2016-09-camera-reveal-extraordinary-wildlife.html
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