Archaeologists digging at Malcolm X's boyhood home in Boston

Archaeologists digging at Malcolm X's boyhood home in Boston
This March 10, 1998, file photo shows the house where slain African-American leader Malcolm X spent part of his childhood, in the Roxbury section of Boston. Archeologists in Boston are digging at the boyhood home of black rights activist Malcolm X. The two-week archaeological dig begins Tuesday, March 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Angela Rowlings, File)

Archeologists in Boston are digging at the boyhood home of slain black rights activist Malcolm X.

The two-week archaeological dig begins Tuesday in Boston's Roxbury neighborhood.

Organizers say they hope to find out more about Malcolm X's .

Members of his family and are expected to help Boston's Archaeology Lab and researchers from the University of Massachusetts-Boston undertake the excavation.

Archaeologists digging at Malcolm X's boyhood home in Boston
In this March 5, 1964 file photo, Black Muslim leader Malcolm X poses during an interview in New York. Archeologists in Boston are digging at the boyhood home of slain black rights activist Malcolm X. The two-week archaeological dig begins Tuesday, March 28, 2016, in Boston's Roxbury neighborhood. (AP Photo/Eddie Adams, File)

The former Malcolm Little lived with his sister's family in Boston in the 1940s as a teenager. Malcolm X was the moniker Little adopted as he became a minister and the principal spokesman for the Nation of Islam in the 1950s and 60s.

Little eventually renounced the radical black Muslim group and was gunned down by its followers at a speech in New York City in 1965.


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Citation: Archaeologists digging at Malcolm X's boyhood home in Boston (2016, March 29) retrieved 16 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-03-archaeologists-malcolm-boyhood-home-boston.html
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