Giant squid makes rare appearance in Japanese port

December 30, 2015
A giant squid, four metres in length, was discovered by fishermen on December 24, 2015 at a port in the city of Toyama on Japan'
A giant squid, four metres in length, was discovered by fishermen on December 24, 2015 at a port in the city of Toyama on Japan's northwestern coast

A giant squid that wandered into a Japanese port has been guided back out to sea almost a week after it was spotted, giving enthusiasts and experts a rare glimpse of the mysterious creature.

The massive invertebrate, four metres (13 feet) in length, was discovered by fishermen on December 24 at a port in the city of Toyama on Japan's northwestern coast.

It was later guided by a diver into deeper seas.

"Its suckers were so strong that I felt some pain," Akinobu Kimura, who runs a dive shop in Toyama, said on TV Asahi.

"Even though I was trying to let it escape (from the port), it wrapped around my body and clung to my arm."

A curator at the local Uozu Aquarium who visited the port and took of the squid was surprised at its size.

"It was unexpectedly beautiful, its body glowing red," he said in footage shown on broadcaster TBS.

Giant squids are sometimes caught in Japanese fishing nets, though filming a live one is rare.

The giant , "Architeuthis" to scientists, is sometimes described as one of the last mysteries of the ocean, being part of a world so hostile to humans that it has been little explored.

Explore further: Giant squid filmed in Pacific depths, Japan scientists report

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xstos
4.2 / 5 (5) Dec 30, 2015
Surprised they let it escape and didn't kill it for "scientific reasons".
OdinsAcolyte
not rated yet Dec 30, 2015
Bait for Moby Dick.
antigoracle
2.3 / 5 (3) Dec 30, 2015
Squiddy Claus?

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