Giant squid gets makeover before showtime

A little elbow grease, some formaldehyde, and a lot of ingenuity—that's what it took for taxidermists at the Museum of Natural History to prettify a giant squid along with a coelacanth, a rare fish known as the "living ...

A little squid sheds light on evolution with bacteria

Bacteria, which are vital for the health of all animals, also played a major role in the evolution of animals and their tissues. In an effort to understand just how animals co-evolved with bacteria over time, researchers ...

How citizen scientists are uncovering octopus secrets

Most of us will have watched a BBC documentary at some point and seen exotic octopuses, cuttlefish and squid in foreign seas. Fewer of us realise that these molluscs, which resemble aliens in our imagination with their tentacles ...

Market squid tell a tale of two krill

In good years, noisy fishing boats filled with freshly-netted market squid spill their slippery catch into processing plants on the California coast. During those years, market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) are California's ...

A squid graveyard and a deep-sea buffet

A recent paper describes an unusual discovery: dead squid littered across the deep sea bottom of the Gulf of California. It's a squid graveyard that might be a boon for deep-sea animals.

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Squid

†Plesioteuthididae (incertae sedis) Myopsina Oegopsina

Squid are marine cephalopods of the order Teuthida, which comprises around 300 species. Like all other cephalopods, squid have a distinct head, bilateral symmetry, a mantle, and arms. Squid, like cuttlefish, have eight arms and two tentacles arranged in pairs. (The only known exception is the bigfin squid group, which have ten very long, thin arms of equal length.)

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