Fred fades in far Atlantic

September 8, 2015 by Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
NOAA SHOUT '15 - Still from overflight of Tropical Storm Fred by NASA Global Hawk Timelapse movie of the overflight of Tropical Storm Fred by the NASA Global Hawk on Sept 5, 2015 as part of the NOAA SHOUT '15 Mission. HDVis camera imagery. Credit: NOAA/NASA/Dave Fratello

Before Tropical Storm Fred fizzled in the Eastern Atlantic, NASA's Global Hawk flew overhead on September 5 and the Global Hawk's imagery was used to create a movie of the flyover as part of NOAA's SHOUT mission.

On Sunday, Sept. 6. at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) the center of Tropical Depression Fred was located near latitude 24.9 North, longitude 43.2 West. The depression was moving toward the north near 10 mph (17 kph). Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph). By 5 p.m. EDT (2100 UTC) on September 6, Fred's maximum sustained winds dropped to 20 knots (23 mph/37 kph) and were weakening quickly.

At that time, the National Hurricane Center issued their final warning on Fred. Fred finally succumbed to adverse atmospheric conditions and was no longer a tropical cyclone.

For information about NOAA's SHOUT mission, visit: http://uas.noaa.gov/shout/.

NOAA SHOUT '15 - Overflight of Tropical Storm Fred by NASA Global Hawk Timelapse movie of the overflight of Tropical Storm Fred by the NASA Global Hawk on Sept 5, 2015 as part of the NOAA SHOUT '15 Mission. HDVis camera imagery. Credit: NOAA/NASA/Dave Fratello

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