Image: Tethys the target

Image: Tethys the target
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Like most moons in the solar system, Saturn's moon Tethys is covered by impact craters. Some craters bear witness to incredibly violent events, such as the crater Odysseus (seen here at the right of the image).

While Tethys is 660 miles (1,062 kilometers) across, the crater Odysseus is 280 miles (450 kilometers) across, covering about 18 percent of the moon's surface area. A comparably sized crater on Earth would be as large as Africa!

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Tethys. North on Tethys is up and rotated 42 degrees to the right.  The image was taken in with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 11, 2015.

The was acquired at a distance of approximately 118,000 miles (190,000 kilometers) from Tethys. Image scale is 3,280 feet (1 kilometer) per pixel.


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Citation: Image: Tethys the target (2015, June 10) retrieved 20 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-06-image-tethys.html
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