Image: Janus from afar

Image: Janus from afar
Credit: JPL/NASA

Cassini's narrow angle camera captures Saturn's tiny irregular moon Janus surrounded by the vast, dark expanse of the outer solar system.

Janus (111 miles, or 179 kilometers across) shares an orbit with the moon Epimetheus; the two moons change orbital positions roughly every four years.

This view looks toward the Saturn-facing side of Janus. North on Janus is up and rotated 38 degrees to the left. The image was taken in with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 10, 2013.

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 621,000 miles (1 million kilometers) from Janus. Raw image scale is 3.7 miles (6 kilometers) per pixel. This image has been zoomed in by a factor of two to enhance the visibility of Janus.


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Provided by JPL/NASA
Citation: Image: Janus from afar (2014, January 13) retrieved 20 November 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-image-janus-afar.html
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