Dawn spirals closer to Ceres, returns a new view

Dawn spirals closer to Ceres, returns a new view
A new view of Ceres' surface shows finer details coming into view as NASA's Dawn spacecraft spirals down to increasingly lower orbits. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

A new view of Ceres, taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on May 23, shows finer detail is becoming visible on the dwarf planet. The spacecraft snapped the image at a distance of 3,200 miles (5,100 kilometers) with a resolution of 1,600 feet (480 meters) per pixel. The image is part of a sequence taken for navigational purposes.

After transmitting these images to Earth on May 23, Dawn resumed ion-thrusting toward its second mapping orbit. On June 3, Dawn will enter this orbit and spend the rest of the month observing Ceres from 2,700 miles (4,400 kilometers) above the surface. Each orbit during this time will be about three days, allowing the spacecraft to conduct an intensive study of Ceres.

Dawn is the first mission to visit a , and the first to orbit two distinct solar system targets. It studied the protoplanet Vesta for 14 months in 2011 and 2012, and arrived at Ceres on March 6, 2015.

Dawn spirals closer to Ceres, returns a new view
This image of Ceres is part of a sequence taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft on May 23, 2015, from a distance of 3,200 miles (5,100 kilometers). Resolution in the image is about 1,600 feet (480 meters) per pixel. The view shows numerous secondary craters, formed by the re-impact of debris strewn from larger impact sites. Smaller surface details like this are becoming visible with increasing clarity as Dawn spirals lower in its campaign to map Ceres. The region shown here is located between 13 degrees and 51 degrees north latitude and 182 degrees and 228 degrees east longitude. The image has been projected onto a globe of Ceres, which accounts for the small notch of black at upper right. OpNav9 is the ninth and final set of Dawn images of Ceres taken primarily for navigation purposes. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

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Ceres animation showcases bright spots

Citation: Dawn spirals closer to Ceres, returns a new view (2015, May 28) retrieved 27 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-dawn-spirals-closer-ceres-view.html
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May 28, 2015
Ruh-roh, crater chains... And some other features that can't be explained away via impact only.

https://www.youtu...1A8qmpXQ

May 28, 2015
Crater chains come from meteors breaking up right before impacting the planet.
Gravitational tidal effects are there, and some bodies are relatively unstable to begin with.

May 28, 2015
CD's misconceptions about crater chains discussed extensively here: http://phys.org/n...den.html . Further discussion is not warranted, as he will never learn.

May 28, 2015
Crater chains come from meteors breaking up right before impacting the planet.
Gravitational tidal effects are there, and some bodies are relatively unstable to begin with.


Not those small chains. Those are secondary craters caused by debris raining down from impacts.

May 28, 2015
Learn? That be funny. Collapse pits, right. Collapse pits with no debris present? Because the gravity on Ceres is so weak the collapse material just falls up, up, and awaaayyyy. That is why you claim there should be no further discussion, because your ridiculous assertions are unfounded nonsense.

Raining debris! In perfect parallel rows. Gravity is magic!

May 29, 2015
So they take a pic of generic craters, but not an image of the bright spots nearby everyone wants to see??? What an asswhip!

May 29, 2015
craters are nice, but the next frame would have a closeup of the lights!!!! what up, never a straight answer? (nasa)

KBK
May 29, 2015
Yo, just so you know, when searching the situation...for some sort of smell that might be coming from the whole thing:

Be it known that Lockheed Martin specifically went out of it's way to be the manufacturer of the Ceres mission.

They did it 'for cost', for 'no profit', so they could be assured to have exclusive control of that mission by being the maker of the satellite itself. To be absolutely sure they were the maker of that specific craft.

So, it's not really NASA's mission... first and foremost, it is Lockheed's observation mission and build.

hhmmmm....

May 29, 2015
Crater chains come from meteors breaking up right before impacting the planet.
Gravitational tidal effects are there, and some bodies are relatively unstable to begin with.


There are no gravitational tidal effects here as there are no significant gravitational bodies near Ceres. Regardless, gravitational tiding is a hypothetical mechanism postulated ad hoc only after planetary phenomena of predicted dead bodies were left without an available source of energy.

Why aren't any of the craters of the crater chains oblong? Why are they ALWAYS circular even when overlapping? Crater chains, sinuous rilles, and long uniformly gouged lines are all produced by a series of small aurora/jet like discharges. This is observed in the 103 jets or geysers in the stripes of Enceladus.

These craters have geometric shapes, smooth floors all with uniform depth (impossible with a variety of impacts) and smaller secondary craters on the rim of the larger; all evidence of a discharge.

May 29, 2015
So they take a pic of generic craters, but not an image of the bright spots nearby everyone wants to see?

When you understand why this is so you will understand the difference between a hack and a scientist.
A hack will jump at anything that seems obvious and not look at the rest. A scientist will go at it methodically and look at everything first so as not to miss anything.
It might sound boring, but you really have to look at all the places where nothing interesting _seems_ to be in order to be able to judge that the place where something interesting _seems_ to be is really interesting/special.

The hack, on the other hand, will fall for the conspiracy theorists' trap. He'll declare something special while remaining firmly - and willfully(!) - ignorant on anything else.

May 29, 2015
Cantdrive

Here is a picture of the comet, shoemaker levy 9, impacting Jupiter in July 1994;
www.ciencia.cl/Ci...evy9.jpg

Notice it created a chain of craters as it was ripped apart by gravitational tidal forces. They form a straight line because they are still have the same forces acting on them in the same direction. These meteors are not exploding apart, there is no atmosphere to heat them, instead they are just gently being pulled apart.
The dramatic impact scene is from the inertia of the two objects smacking into each other, nothing else

May 29, 2015

The hack, on the other hand, will fall for the conspiracy theorists' trap. He'll declare something special while remaining firmly - and willfully(!) - ignorant on anything else.


It would seem most efficient to start with what looks interesting and work your way through everything from there. They just cant change the trajectory of the craft to investigate the lights is all.

May 29, 2015
Rossim,
The phrase "tidal forces" comes from the fact it's the exact same thing that makes the tides. The tides are not some scientific conspiracy you lunatic

May 29, 2015
It would seem most efficient to start with what looks interesting and work your way through everything from there. They just cant change the trajectory of the craft to investigate the lights is all.
@minion_of_zeppelin
actually, it is the reverse: it is more interesting to start that way, but it will not always get you the best results, nor is it the most efficient way to investigate anything
like a forensic specialist at a crime scene, the above takes its time and works from the outside in to establish the details and collect all the data possible while paying attention to even the smallest point

AA_P has a great description, IMHO
(and i love the name- LZ ROCKS)
Cantdrive

Here is a picture of the comet, shoemaker levy 9
@Steve 200mph Cruiz
good luck with cd!
i've used the exact same point, and he still refuses to accept anything other than eu dogma

& rossim?
WTF?
ROTFLMFAO

May 30, 2015
It would seem most efficient to start with what looks interesting and work your way through everything from there.

The danger with that approach is that it easily leads to bias (and if anything the scientific method tris to avoid bias).
It's a bit like in poker. If you don't look dispassionatly at the odds of what the others are holding first you tend to fall in love with your hand (and lose).

Don't worry. They'll get around to imaging the white spots.

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