Shape shifting liquid metal able to propel itself through liquids (w/ video)

March 11, 2015 by Bob Yirka, Phys.org weblog
Shape shifting liquid metal able to propel itself through liquids

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Tsinghua University in China has, according to a report in Newscientist, found a way to mimic, if only in a small way, the shape shifting robot in the Terminator movies. The team has published their findings in the journal Advanced Materials.

As part of an effort to better understand the properties of liquid metals, the researchers were working with gallium—after adding a little bit of indium and tin they discovered that if a bit of aluminum was affixed to a single of the alloy (to serve as fuel) and the result was dropped into a container of (or even ) the drop would propel itself around the container for approximately one hour. In subsequent tests they found that if the container was shaped with channels, the drop could be made to follow a pre-designated path. What's more, they noted that if the drop encountered a part of the channel that was slimmer than it was, it could squeeze through.

Surprised by the movement of the drop, the researchers took a closer look—analysis revealed that when the drop was placed in the solution, a charge imbalance occurred between the front and back of the drop, causing a pressure differential. They also found that as the aluminum reacted with the saltwater, were formed which also served to push the drop forward (so long as the aluminum bit was on the back end.)

The experiments by the team build on prior work by them and others (as part of an effort to make "soft" robots) that showed that with some , an electric charge can cause both an expansion and change of shape to a drop. The researchers note that if both techniques were used, the result could be drops that not only move themselves through liquids, but change shape according to predetermined needs. They suggest their findings could conceivably pave the way for drops that are used to deliver materials via pipes or even through blood vessels.

Credit: Advanced Materials, Article first published online: 3 MAR 2015. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201405438

Interestingly, the also noted that if the drop were forced to remain in place in the solution it would cause the liquid around it to move, in essence serving as a pump.

Credit: Advanced Materials, Article first published online: 3 MAR 2015. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201405438

Credit: Advanced Materials, Article first published online: 3 MAR 2015. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201405438

Explore further: Researchers develop a way to cause static self-assembly using magnets and ferrofluids

More information: Self-Fueled Biomimetic Liquid Metal Mollusk, Advanced Materials, Article first published online: 3 MAR 2015. DOI: 10.1002/adma.201405438

Abstract
A liquid metal motor that can "eat" aluminum food and then move spontaneously and swiftly in various solution configurations and structured channels for more than 1 h is discovered. Such biomimetic mollusk is highly shape self-adaptive by closely conforming to the geometrical space it voyages in. The first ever self-fueled pump is illustrated as one of its typical practical utilizations.

via Newscientist

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6 comments

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El_Nose
5 / 5 (2) Mar 11, 2015
i for one would like to welcome our new metallic overlords
Mike_Massen
1 / 5 (2) Mar 11, 2015
Eeek, there are so many ways such a principle could be used, even just to pump water, especially so if it could be replenished re its energy mechanism...

Incidentally, afaik, Gallium is sometimes found in bauxite as the latter is mostly Aluminium Oxide and feedstock for Aluminium refining, so what happened to the Gallium from the 3 smelters where I live in Western Australia ?
Zarathustra
3 / 5 (2) Mar 11, 2015
Interestingly, there is basic chemistry at work here. Aluminum reacts vigorously with sodium hydroxide to form hydrogen gas, The gas generated would cause the physical movement of the liquid metal through an unmiscible liquid. The physical properties of gallium are well known. I do wonder at the concept that a "charge differential" is causing the movement of the drop of alloy.
Dethe
not rated yet Mar 11, 2015
Of course it's a surface tension effect - compare the mercury and gallium heart experiment. No hydrogen is involved in it. It's true, that the article does a bad service in explanation of this effect.
Zarathustra
1 / 5 (1) Mar 11, 2015
"tiny bubbles were formed which also served to push the drop forward (so long as the aluminum bit was on the back end.)" Nuf sed.
bonneyaya
not rated yet Mar 12, 2015
Love that Mercury. Is that why China's got all that mercury in its pyramid?

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