Image: The magnetic field along the galactic plane

December 16, 2014
Credit: ESA/Planck Collaboration. Acknowledgment: M.-A. Miville-Deschênes, CNRS – Institut d’Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-XI, Orsay, France

While the pastel tones and fine texture of this image may bring to mind brush strokes on an artist's canvas, they are in fact a visualisation of data from ESA's Planck satellite. The image portrays the interaction between interstellar dust in the Milky Way and the structure of our Galaxy's magnetic field.

Between 2009 and 2013, Planck scanned the sky to detect the most ancient light in the history of the Universe – the cosmic microwave background. It also detected significant foreground emission from diffuse material in our Galaxy which, although a nuisance for cosmological studies, is extremely important for studying the birth of stars and other phenomena in the Milky Way.

Among the foreground sources at the wavelengths probed by Planck is cosmic dust, a minor but crucial component of the interstellar medium that pervades the Galaxy. Mainly gas, it is the raw material for stars to form.

Interstellar clouds of gas and dust are also threaded by the Galaxy's , and dust grains tend to align their longest axis at right angles to the direction of the field. As a result, the light emitted by is partly 'polarised' – it vibrates in a preferred direction – and, as such, could be caught by the polarisation-sensitive detectors on Planck.

Scientists in the Planck collaboration are using the polarised emission of to reconstruct the Galaxy's magnetic field and study its role in the build-up of structure in the Milky Way, leading to star formation.

In this image, the colour scale represents the total intensity of dust emission, revealing the structure of in the Milky Way. The texture is based on measurements of the direction of the polarised light emitted by the dust, which in turn indicates the orientation of the magnetic field.

This image shows the intricate link between the magnetic field and the structure of the along the plane of the Milky Way. In particular, the arrangement of the magnetic field is more ordered along the Galactic plane, where it follows the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Small clouds are seen just above and below the plane, where the magnetic field structure becomes less regular.

From these and other similar observations, Planck scientists found that filamentary interstellar clouds are preferentially aligned with the direction of the ambient magnetic field, highlighting the strong role played by magnetism in galaxy evolution.

The emission from dust is computed from a combination of Planck observations at 353, 545 and 857 GHz, whereas the direction of the magnetic field is based on Planck polarisation data at 353 GHz.

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cantdrive85
1.3 / 5 (12) Dec 16, 2014
From these and other similar observations, Planck scientists found that filamentary interstellar clouds are preferentially aligned with the direction of the ambient magnetic field,


The filamentary clouds are creating the localized "ambient magnetic field", this explains the preferential alignment.

In particular, the arrangement of the magnetic field is more ordered along the Galactic plane, where it follows the spiral structure of the Milky Way.


As this is where the currents flow into the central plasmoid.
imido
Dec 16, 2014
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Macksb
1.6 / 5 (10) Dec 16, 2014
Edwin Land is the famous founder of Polaroid Corporation. See his Wikipedia biography. His great breakthrough was the same system described in this article. First, he tried to grow a large polarizing crystal. Didn't work. Then he tried millions of micron sized crystals, which he was able to align perfectly on film.

In the article, the dust grains are aligned just as Dr. Land would have imagined, in a plane much like Polaroid's film.

The ESA results described in the article, and Dr. Land's invention, both derive from Art Winfree's law of coupled oscillators, which I have described in many prior posts.

I believe that the order described in the article above drives the galactic structure. Further, I believe it also drives the spin alignment, recently observed, when spiral galaxies merge.
Macksb
2 / 5 (12) Dec 16, 2014
Continuing my post above, the magnetic order, and the self-organizing system of which it is a part, may have far greater implications.

Specifically, they may explain the mystery of the galaxy rotation problem, first discovered by Vera Rubin. Same speed throughout the system, rather than diminishing speed at the outward portion. Yet "held together" in some way that our idea of gravity does not explain. These two fundamental galactic properties are mysteries, which the dark matter theory was created to explain. I reject it. IMO, the order and system described in the article explain those mysteries.

This is why it is dangerous to assume that our solar system, and its order, is a good model for the order of a galaxy. The systematic order described in this article is of a different strength and quality than that in our solar system.
arom
Dec 16, 2014
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Maggnus
4.3 / 5 (11) Dec 16, 2014
Interstellar clouds of gas and dust are also threaded by the Galaxy's magnetic field, and dust grains tend to align their longest axis at right angles to the direction of the field. ….

This image shows the intricate link between the magnetic field and the structure of the interstellar medium along the plane of the Milky Way. In particular, the arrangement of the magnetic field is more ordered along the Galactic plane, where it follows the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Small clouds are seen just above and below the plane, where the magnetic field structure becomes less regular.


It seems that there is no explanation about the nature of this magnetic field, which also could be found around any other galaxies; maybe this understandable idea could give some hint … http://www.vacuum...=7〈=en


The vacuum guy! Bet on how long till this sock-puppet is banned anyone?
Maggnus
4.7 / 5 (13) Dec 16, 2014
Oh, and not to miss out - the word "magnetic" is in the title, meaning that canthinkforhimself will post some anasility (notice the pun there Stumpy? LOL!!)
OZGuy
5 / 5 (9) Dec 16, 2014
Maggnus It's still only mid-week and the EU crowd have already been stirred into action providing us with a cornucopia of meaningless word salads. Seems all you need is the word electric, magnetic or maybe simply a word containing the letter 'e' and arom is here flogging his vacuum-mechanic hyperbole with cantdrive and zephir and their sockpuppet entourage providing the same tired old chorus.

Thankfully the words evolution, mutation, god or dark matter ( you know the rest of the trigger words) weren't in the article or have the whole basement gang would be here and their mutual masturbation would have gone on for days.
Protoplasmix
5 / 5 (7) Dec 16, 2014
The filamentary clouds are creating the localized "ambient magnetic field", this explains the preferential alignment.

It's a dirty plasma. The dust grains providing the polarization data at 353 GHz are longer than they are wide, and typically spinning 10s of millions of times a second from radiation and collisions with other atoms. The preferential alignment is from magnetic fields "threading the interstellar clouds" – the long axis of the grain is aligned perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field. The ESA's Planck satellite has taken a stunning picture of our galaxy's "magnetic fingerprint", see: http://www.esa.in...r_Galaxy

In the data-based rendering above, the dust/galactic magnetic field interaction looks unmistakably magnetohydrodynamic.
Protoplasmix
5 / 5 (7) Dec 16, 2014
Cnt'd >
Not only that, a study of the genus curve of polarized B-mode emission of the Planck 353 GHz map, compared to that seen the BICEP2 B-mode map, "provides further evidence favoring gravitational wave detection". See: http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.4491
imido
Dec 16, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Protoplasmix
4.5 / 5 (8) Dec 16, 2014
genus curve of polarized B-mode emission of the Planck 353 GHz map
These are stationary gravitational lenses of dark matter and large galactic clusters, not a waves

No, it's polarized light, straight from dust that was argued may have invalidated BICEP2's findings. Turns out it didn't, at 2.5 sigma level. Further evidence...
big_hairy_jimbo
5 / 5 (3) Dec 17, 2014
Just wondering if they take into account the distance factor and hence time?? ie the closer the dust is to Earth, then the closer in time the magnetic field interpreation is. But dust further away, will show a magnetic field as it was much further back in time. So the map they see, should really be all messed up time wise. Does this make sense?? How do they overcome this?
Protoplasmix
5 / 5 (6) Dec 17, 2014
Just wondering if they take into account the distance factor and hence time?? ie the closer the dust is to Earth, then the closer in time the magnetic field interpreation is. But dust further away, will show a magnetic field as it was much further back in time. So the map they see, should really be all messed up time wise. Does this make sense?? How do they overcome this?
Very good questions. Researchers had to combine more than 41,000 individual measurements across the sky. They've ascertained the Faraday depth (what the map shows) by measuring Faraday rotation. See http://www.nrl.na...c-fields
Protoplasmix
5 / 5 (4) Dec 17, 2014
late edit - "what the map shows", refers to Fig. 1 at the above link, sorry if that's confusing.
big_hairy_jimbo
4.8 / 5 (5) Dec 17, 2014
Thanks Protoplasmix, after reading that article I now realise that the light measured travelled THROUGH THE ENTIRE galaxy from behind it. Thus the magnetic field must be an average for the line of sight beam. Many measurements were needed to assess each line of sight.
Seems information field theory is used to make sense of all the data.
After reading all of that, I'm not sure how reliable that map is, but obviously I'm not qualified to assess that, other than it seems quite an amazing accomplishment that baffles me!!!!!
imido
Dec 21, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
vidyunmaya
1 / 5 (3) Jan 09, 2015
My book "OM COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS TO COSMOLOGY REVISION-2000( TXU 982-559) Pages 94, Fig 16-" provide the regions at the Milky for search routes-divided roughly 3000 LY from Galactic Center to thee edge- Sun-Earth region is located.
Three critical regions -SRISTI-STITHI-LAYAM- identify Magnetic Field orientation from Horizontal mode to Vertical mode to catch-up Cosmic Flow Sequence. The Dark mode data control and regulation. Observations Flow-down link near and below Sun. Further highlights in- SPACE VISION-OM-COSMOLOGICAL INDEX-By Vidyardhi Nanduri-TXU 1-731-970 - SPACE SCIENCE-Reports Cover [ESA]-2010- PROPOSALS-Environment-Sensex-Earth-Glow-Sun Life-Significance - Human Being in-depth-Milky-way Sensex-Aditya links
1.ENVIRONMENT SENSEX-EARTH'S GLOW-SUN-LIFE SIGNIFICANCE -.PPT-27
2.SUN TO ADITYA-COSMOLOGY VEDAS INTERLINKS –PPT-27
3.COSMOLOGICAL INDEX-MILKYWAY SENSEX-VISIBLE -INVISIBLE MATRIX -PPT 33
See also COSPAR 2013 -NANDI-Flow-Fields.Cosmology Vedas Interlinks.

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