Oceans apart: Study reveals insights into the evolution of languages

September 2, 2014, Wiley
Oceans apart: Study reveals insights into the evolution of languages
This is a map of 57 Japonic languages. The Japanese Islands comprise 6,852 islands of which 258 are inhabited. Scale bar: 1000 km. Credit: Journal of Evolutionary Biology

A new Journal of Evolutionary Biology study provides evidence that physical barriers formed by oceans can influence language diversification.

Investigators argue that the same factor responsible for much of the biodiversity in the Galápagos Islands is also responsible for the in the Japanese Islands: the natural oceanic barriers that impede interaction between speech communities. Therefore, spatially isolated languages gradually diverge from one another due to a reduction of linguistic contact.

"Charles Darwin would have been amused by a study like this, because it confirms his hypothesis that languages, like species, are the product of evolution," said lead author Dr. Sean Lee.

Explore further: Language 'evolution' may shed light on human migration out-of-Beringia

More information: Lee, S. and Hasegawa, T. (2014), Oceanic barriers promote language diversification in the Japanese Islands. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 27: 1905. DOI: 10.1111/jeb.12442

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JVK
1 / 5 (1) Sep 03, 2014
Excerpt: "Charles Darwin would have been amused by a study like this, because it confirms his hypothesis that languages, like species, are the product of evolution," said lead author Dr. Sean Lee.

Darwin and Dobzhansky would be amused by this interpretation of the results. Both would by now have recognized that no evolutionary events have ever been described that could link the language gene from epigenetically-effected changes in the microRNA/messenger RNA balance to miR-9 and miR-140-5p and to FoxP2, which appears to be regulated as a function of the social context of singing behavior in zebra finches.

http://dx.doi.org...jn.12457

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