Image: King Fire in California still blazing

King Fire in California still blazing
This natural-color satellite image was collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Aqua satellite on Sept. 23, 2014. Actively burning areas, detected by MODIS's thermal bands, are outlined in red. Credit: NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team. Caption: NASA/Goddard, Lynn Jenner with information from Inciweb.

Over 92,960 acres have been burned by the King Fire since it began on September 13, 2014. The fire is currently 38% contained, and the cause of the fire is arson. Over 7,600 personnel are battling this fire.

With the southwest winds there is a potential for extreme behavior if the winds, fuels, and topography come into alignment. There is the possibility for single and group tree torching, upslope crown runs, and spotting up to 1/2 mile. The highest probability is on the northwest portion of the fire.

A Red Flag warning remains in effect for this fire. A Red Flag warning means that critical fire weather conditions are predicted to occur, meaning the possibility of strong winds, low humidity and warm temperatures. That trio of weather conditions contribute can contribute to extreme fire behavior, according to the National Weather Service. Later in the week temperatures are predicted to drop and there could be a few droplets here and there. It is unclear if the precipitation will be enough to quell the fires.


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Citation: Image: King Fire in California still blazing (2014, September 24) retrieved 17 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-09-image-king-california-blazing.html
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