Hawaii town merchant: Lava is slow-motion disaster

Hawaii town merchant: Lava is slow-motion disaster
This Monday Sept. 8, 2014, aerial photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, shows a smoke plume from the June 27th flow from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. Lava from one of the world's most active volcanos has been advancing at a slower pace the past few days and is now moving parallel to a sparsely populated subdivision on Hawaii's Big Island. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey, Tim Orr)

Businesses in a small Hawaii town are facing a slow-motion disaster as lava from Kilauea volcano oozes toward roads connecting them to the rest of the Big Island.

Surf shop co-owner Tiffany Edwards Hunt said Wednesday there's a threat Pahoa could become a if lava crosses the highway.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira says he's never experienced lava crossing a road so heavily relied on by residents and businesses.

Oliveira says the part of Highway 130 that could be cut off is used by 7,000 to 11,000 vehicles per day.

Geologists say the could reach the road in about two weeks if it continues on its current path.

Hunt and other met Wednesday with civil defense officials to prepare.

  • Hawaii town merchant: Lava is slow-motion disaster
    In this Sept. 6, 2014 aerial photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava advances from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. Lava issued from several spots along a deep ground crack earlier this week, as shown by the distinct fingers of lava making up the flow front. The thick smoke plumes show the flow front moving downslope towards the north. Lava from one of the world's most active volcanos has been advancing at a slower pace the past few days and is now moving parallel to a sparsely populated subdivision on Hawaii's Big Island. Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira says the lava from Kilauea volcano is still at least a mile away from any homes in Kaohe Homesteads. (AP Photo/Tim Orr, U.S. Geological Survey)
  • Hawaii town merchant: Lava is slow-motion disaster
    In this Sept. 6, 2014 photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey, surface flows have recently cut a swath through thick forest from the June 27 lava flow from the Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The June 27 lava flow is named for the date it began erupting from a new vent. Lava from one of the world's most active volcanos has been advancing at a slower pace the past few days and is now moving parallel to a sparsely populated subdivision on Hawaii's Big Island. Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira says the lava from Kilauea volcano is still at least a mile away from any homes in Kaohe Homesteads. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

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