Video: Researchers instruct scientists in giant role tiny fungi play

August 19, 2014 by Andrea Brunais, Virginia Tech

Trichoderma, a fungus, helps humans in many ways, including giving denim that stone-washed look. Scientists have found it is also especially good at eating "bad" fungi.

At a Virginia Tech-led workshop in the rural town of Bharatpur, Nepal, researchers, scientists, and agriculture experts gathered to learn more about the inexpensive, environmentally friendly bio-agent.

Get the full story in this two-minute video:

Explore further: Video: Scientists combat hunger in Cambodia via conservation agriculture

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