Some Obama spy changes hampered by complications

Some Obama spy changes hampered by complications
In this Jan. 17, 2014, photo, President Barack Obama Talks about National Security Agency surveillance at the Justice Department in Washington. Obama's orders to change some U.S. surveillance practices put the burden on Congress to deal with a national security controversy that has alarmed Americans and outraged foreign allies. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

Legal experts warn that several of the key surveillance reforms pushed by President Barack Obama face complications that could muddy the proposals' authority, slow their momentum in Congress and saddle the government with heavy costs and bureaucracy.

Despite Obama's plans to shift the National Security Agency's mass storage of Americans' phone records elsewhere, telephone companies do not want the responsibility. And the government could face privacy and structural hurdles in relying on any other entity to store the data.

Constitutional analysts also question Obama's plan to set up a panel of privacy experts to intervene in some proceedings of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which oversees the NSA's data mining operations. Only government attorneys are currently authorized to appear before the secret courts.


Explore further

Justice Department is venue for Obama NSA speech

© 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Citation: Some Obama spy changes hampered by complications (2014, January 20) retrieved 20 January 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2014-01-obama-spy-hampered-complications.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments