TRMM satellite animation gives flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's heavy rains

September 17, 2013
This 3-D image of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall was created from TRMM satellite data for Sept. 16. Heaviest rainfall appears in red towers over the Gulf of Mexico, while moderate rainfall stretched from there inland over eastern Mexico. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM can compile the rain in which rain is falling as it orbits from space. When it passed over Tropical Storm Ingrid on Sept. 16 TRMM gathered data and it was used to create a NASA 3-D flyby of the storm.

When NASA's TRMM satellite flew over Tropical Storm Ingrid on Sept. 16, it was drenching the Atlantic side in the Gulf of Mexico. On Sept. 16, Hurricane Ingrid weakened to a tropical storm and came ashore from the Gulf of Mexico into the state of Tamaulipas near La Pesca, Mexico. Today, Sept. 17, Ingrid's heavy rainfall continues as the storm weakened to a remnant low pressure area over eastern Mexico.

TRMM from Sept. 16 at 0227 UTC (Sept. 15 at 10:27 p.m. EDT) were used to create a 3-D image of Ingrid's rainfall. That 3-D image of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall showed heaviest rainfall appeared over the Gulf of Mexico, where rain was falling at a rate of 2 inches/50 mm per hour. Moderate rainfall stretched from the Gulf northwest and inland over eastern Mexico.

The National Hurricane Center issued the final advisory on the remnants of Ingrid on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 5 a.m. EDT. At that time Ingrid's remnants were located near latitude 23.7 north and longitude 99.9 west about 50 miles/75 km west of Ciudad Victoria, Mexico. The remnant low pressure area and associated showers and thunderstorms were moving westward at 5 mph/ 7 kph. Ingrid's have decreased to near 25 mph/35 kph.

The video will load shortly
This 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall was created from TRMM satellite data for Sept. 16. Heaviest rainfall appears in red towers over the Gulf of Mexico, while moderate rainfall stretched from there inland over eastern Mexico. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Ingrid over Mexico on Sept. 16 at 1945 UTC/3:45 p.m. EDT as it continued to soak northeaster Mexico. The northern extent of Ingrid's clouds stretch over southern Texas. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
The National Hurricane Center noted that the remnants of Ingrid are expected to produce 10 to 15 inches of rain over a large part of eastern Mexico with isolated amounts of 25 inches possible, especially in areas of mountainous terrain. That rainfall from Ingrid's remnants is expected to cause flooding and mud-slides over eastern Mexico for the next few days.

Explore further: GOES Satellite catches three tropical cyclones in one shot, sees Gabrielle absorbed

Related Stories

NASA saw Tropical Storm Manuel soak western Mexico

September 16, 2013

Tropical Storm Manuel was soaking southwestern Mexico while Tropical Storm Ingrid was soaking eastern Mexico on Sept. 16. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Manuel and the AIRS instrument captured infrared data that showed ...

Friday the 13th brings double tropical trouble to Mexico

September 13, 2013

Friday the thirteenth is known for being unlucky and residents along Mexico's eastern and western coast are experiencing that feeling as a result of newborn Tropical Depression 13E in the eastern Pacific Ocean, and newborn ...

Recommended for you

Study finds parrotfish are critical to coral reef health

January 23, 2017

An analysis of fossilized parrotfish teeth and sea urchin spines by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego showed that when there are more algae-eating fish on a reef, ...

Caves in central China show history of natural flood patterns

January 19, 2017

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found that major flooding and large amounts of precipitation occur on 500-year cycles in central China. These findings shed light on the forecasting of future floods and improve ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.