Scientists moving 15-ton magnet from NY to Chicago

Revolutionary muon experiment to begin with 3,200-mile move of 50-foot-wide particle storage ring
A model of the truck that will be used to transport the Muon g-2 ring, placed on a streetscape for scale. The truck will be escorted by police and other vehicles when it moves from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to a barge, and then from the barge to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois. Credit: Fermilab

A 50-foot-wide electromagnet built in suburban New York is headed on a five-week journey to Chicago.

The electromagnet weighs at least 15 tons and was the largest in the world when it was built by scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s.

Brookhaven scientists no longer have a need for the electromagnet, so it is being moved to the Fermi laboratory, where it will be used in a new experiment called Muon g-2. (MEW'-on jee-minus-two).

The results could create in the realm of .

The magnet will be taken by barge down the Atlantic, around Florida, then up the Mississippi River to Illinois.

The move is expected to cost about $3 million. But constructing an entirely new could cost as much as $30 million.


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Massive particle storage ring to begin 3,200-mile trek on Sunday

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Jun 16, 2013
It'll be riddled with bullet holes.

Jun 21, 2013
The main problem is the avoiding of all deforms and impacts, because the annealed neodymium-tin alloy is extremely brittle (which is the consequence of its superconductivity at low temperature). The electrons inside of f-orbitals cages are squeezing the electrons inside of d-orbital, which induces their compression and condensation into superconductive state - but it results into the internal stress and brittleness of atom lattice too.

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