Obama meets privacy board on spy programs

US President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference in Mexico City, May 2, 2013
US President Barack Obama speaks during a press conference in Mexico City, May 2, 2013. Obama Friday meets members of a privacy watchdog board, finally fully active after years of delays, to discuss a furor over US spy agency Internet and telephone snooping.

US President Barack Obama Friday meets members of a privacy watchdog board, finally fully active after years of delays, to discuss a furor over US spy agency Internet and telephone snooping.

The meeting will take place in the secure Situation Room of the White House to allow classified information to be discussed, and comes as Obama pledges to permit a public debate about the scope of the programs.

"The president looks forward to hearing from members of the board about their areas of focus and discussing recent developments, including the disclosure of classified information," said White House spokesman Jay Carney.

Carney also said that in the coming weeks, Obama would be meeting various unidentified "stakeholders" in the debate to foster public discussion about the (NSA) programs.

The five-member Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) was set in 2004 but has rarely been active. It has only recently been fully staffed, following years of partisan wrangling over its establishment.

It is an independent agency with a mission to analyze and review White House policies and actions on terrorism, and to ensure they are balanced with a need to protect civil liberties and privacy.

Obama has warned that to protect Americans from terrorism there must be some compromises regarding privacy but says he believes he has got the balance largely correct.

He said in Berlin on Wednesday that "lives have been saved" by the programs, details of which emerged in leaks to the and Guardian newspapers, and around 50 terrorist plots had been disrupted.

Obama has repeatedly explained that the controversial activity, which involves sweeping up data on phone and Internet traffic, does not delve into the specific content of the calls or emails.

Only if there are leads related to terrorism or the proliferation of would US agents ask a special court to allow them to look deeper into the records, he says.


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Citation: Obama meets privacy board on spy programs (2013, June 21) retrieved 27 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-06-obama-privacy-board-spy.html
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Jun 21, 2013
In the situation room, the privacy advocates hear the following from Obama.
You will now agree there is nothing wrong with what I'm doing. If not, you will have your Taxes audited by the IRS, the DOJ will investigate drug usage as you called a known drug dealer 3 years ago, and of course we will let your wife know that it appears you have a mistress as you called a lady 5 times and drove to her home several times, and the media will find out that in High School you bullied Joe and that on a private facebook post you made a racist comment showing you are a bully and a racist.

Gotta love Metadata....Now go and tell the world I have done nothing wrong.

Jun 22, 2013
Hey, freethinking, don't forget the EPA, the FBI, the NLRB, the FTC, the FEC, DHS, MediaMatters, et al, and the "unbiased", "objective" "news" media. They all want to play "destroy Obama's opposition" too.

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