NSA seeks recruits via Twitter

June 7, 2013
Twitter's logo is seen on the screen of a Blackberry phone in Quimper, France, on October 23, 2012. The National Security Agency (NSA) is using Twitter to find new recruits.

The National Security Agency (NSA) is looking for a few good cybersnoops. This week's furor over top-secret collection of phone records and online data isn't deterring the US government's electronic intelligence-gathering service from placing help-wanted posts on its @NSACareers Twitter feed.

Experts in computer security, malware or cryptography can apply for the three-year Digital Network Exploitation Analyst Development Program, which seeks to develop individuals "who can perform discovery and target technology analysis of digital network and ."

"Graduates of this program are aggressively sought after because of their in-depth knowledge and breadth of experiences," according to a job description at www..gov linked to the NSA feed.

There's also a four-year Cyber Exploitation Corps Development Program which churns out "an elite group of professional operators with expert abilities in Computer Network Operations."

"We are looking for people with a solid understanding of network penetration techniques, tools and methodologies that can defend a network from attack," says the job description.

"If you routinely visit network security websites, attend conferences, or maintain your own network we would like to talk to you!"

Only US citizens need apply, but the NSA wants the world to know it's gay-friendly: "This #LGBT Month, #NSA honors and celebrates all LGBT citizens, especially those who have made contributions to national security."

Explore further: Is Big Data turning government into 'Big Brother'? (Update)

Related Stories

But wait, there's more: A US spying Q&A

June 7, 2013

Wait, there's more? Yes, this was the week that America's intelligence secrets spilled out: Classified court orders. Top secret Power Point slides. Something called PRISM. It's pretty important stuff, once you've made sense ...

Paper: UK government getting US spy agency's data (Update)

June 7, 2013

The U.K. has been secretly gathering communications data from American Internet giants with the help of fellow spooks at the U.S. National Security Agency, the Guardian newspaper reported Friday, a demonstration of the international ...

Homeland Security and spy agency to work together

October 14, 2010

(AP) -- Computer experts at the secretive National Security Agency are teaming up with the Homeland Security Department in an effort to strengthen the nation's defenses against cyber attacks.

New reports allege vast US Internet spying sweep

June 7, 2013

US spies are secretly tapping into servers of nine Internet giants including Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and Google in a vast anti-terror sweep targeting foreigners, explosive reports said Thursday.

Recommended for you

Your (social media) votes matter

January 24, 2017

When Tim Weninger conducted two large-scale experiments on Reddit - otherwise known as "the front page of the internet" - back in 2014, the goal was to better understand the ripple effects of malicious voting behavior and ...

Protective wear inspired by fish scales

January 24, 2017

They started with striped bass. Over a two-year period the researchers went through about 50 bass, puncturing or fracturing hundreds of fish scales under the microscope, to try to understand their properties and mechanics ...

'Droneboarding' takes off in Latvia

January 22, 2017

Skirted on all sides by snow-clad pine forests, Latvia's remote Lake Ninieris would be the perfect picture of winter tranquility—were it not for the huge drone buzzing like a swarm of angry bees as it zooms above the solid ...

Singapore 2G switchoff highlights digital divide

January 22, 2017

When Singapore pulls the plug on its 2G mobile phone network this year, thousands of people could be stuck without a signal—digital have-nots left behind by the relentless march of technology.

Making AI systems that see the world as humans do

January 19, 2017

A Northwestern University team developed a new computational model that performs at human levels on a standard intelligence test. This work is an important step toward making artificial intelligence systems that see and understand ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.