Local police grapple with response to cybercrimes

Local police grapple with response to cybercrimes
In this Dec. 13, 2011, file photo, a California Department of Justice employee holds up counterfeit jewelry that was confiscated during an investigation before it was sold on eBay during a news conference in San Jose, Calif. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

(AP)—If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police.

If a steals $900 from that person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help?

Police now don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes, and they rely heavily on the expertise of the , which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes.

Local police grapple with response to cybercrimes
In this Jan. 11, 2013, file photo, equipment to analyze mobile and smart phones is displayed in a lab during a media tour of the Cybercrime Center at Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

What's missing is the first response role, typically owned by local police.

around the country are now looking to boost their expertise to respond to these cybercrimes and cyberthreats.

Officials have said cyberthreats will soon become as big as or eclipse the threat of terrorism.

Local police grapple with response to cybercrimes
In this Nov. 8, 2006, file photo, confiscated computers and child-oriented pornographic tapes fill the storeroom shelves in the Florida Attorney General's Child Predator CyberCrime Unit office in Jacksonville, Fla. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Oscar Sosa)

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