S.Korea urges Russia to send rocket parts swiftly

November 13, 2012
Image provided by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute shows the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-1 being launched in 2009. South Korea has urged Russia to send rocket parts as soon as possible so it can go ahead with an already-delayed satellite launch, an official said.

South Korea has urged Russia to send rocket parts as soon as possible so it can go ahead with an already-delayed satellite launch this month, an official said Tuesday.

Seoul wants to make another attempt to send the satellite into space between November 9 and 24 after last month's was cancelled because of a defective part.

"We've been asking Russia to give a green light at the earliest possible date, but we don't know when we will have the parts," Kim Yeon-Hak, a deputy director at the , told AFP.

The October 26 launch was cancelled after engineers detected a broken rubber seal in the connector between the launch pad and the rocket's first stage.

"We cannot confirm whether the launch will be made within the current window", Kim said.

Kim Seung-Jo, president of the , said the parts must arrive no later than Wednesday if the rocket is to be launched on or before November 24.

Image provided by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute shows the KSLV-1 being launched in 2009. After two failures in 2009 and 2010, the upcoming exercise is considered crucial for South Korea's efforts to join an elite space club that includes China, Japan and India.

It will take at least 10 days after the parts arrive to refit the rocket and put it back on the on the south coast, Kim Seung-Jo said Monday.

Should the launch be put off again, South Korea would reset the period through consultations with international space agencies, he said.

Dates for the launch period are conveyed to international agencies to minimise risks to ships and aircraft that could pass near the flight path.

The 140-tonne Korea Vehicle-1 (KSLV-1) has a first stage manufactured by Russia and a solid-fuel second stage built by South Korea.

The technical problem that aborted last month's launch was not described as serious but the damaged rubber seal was sent back to its Russian manufacturer for inspections.

After two failures in 2009 and 2010, the upcoming exercise is considered crucial for South Korea's efforts to join an elite space club that includes Asian powers China, Japan and India.

In 2009 the rocket achieved orbit but faulty release mechanisms on the second stage prevented proper deployment of the satellite.

The 2010 effort saw the rocket explode two minutes into its flight, with both Russia and South Korea blaming each other.

South Korea is a late entrant into the world of space technology and is eager to get its commercial launch programme up and running.

Explore further: S. Korea sets new window for rocket launch

Related Stories

S. Korea sets new window for rocket launch

October 29, 2012

South Korea said Monday it would make another attempt to send a satellite into space next month after a scheduled rocket launch last week was cancelled because of a technical glitch.

S. Korea to make third rocket launch bid in October

September 11, 2012

South Korea will make its third attempt next month to put a satellite in space, the science ministry said Tuesday, as it bids to join an exclusive club of Asian nations with space-launch capability.

Recommended for you

One of the brightest distant galaxies known discovered

January 23, 2017

An international team led by researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL) has discovered one of the brightest "non-active" galaxies in the early universe. Finding ...

Dwarf galaxies shed light on dark matter

January 23, 2017

The first sighting of clustered dwarf galaxies bolsters a leading theory about how big galaxies such as our Milky Way are formed, and how dark matter binds them, researchers said Monday.

Freeze-dried food and 1 bathroom: 6 simulate Mars in dome

January 20, 2017

Crammed into a dome with one bathroom, six scientists will spend eight months munching on mostly freeze-dried foods—with a rare treat of Spam—and have only their small sleeping quarters to retreat to for solace.

Image: Wavemaker moon Daphnis

January 20, 2017

The wavemaker moon, Daphnis, is featured in this view, taken as NASA's Cassini spacecraft made one of its ring-grazing passes over the outer edges of Saturn's rings on Jan. 16, 2017. This is the closest view of the small ...

Video: A colorful 'landing' on Pluto

January 20, 2017

What would it be like to actually land on Pluto? This movie was made from more than 100 images taken by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft over six weeks of approach and close flyby in the summer of 2015. The video offers a trip ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.