S. Korea to make third rocket launch bid in October

September 11, 2012

South Korea will make its third attempt next month to put a satellite in space, the science ministry said Tuesday, as it bids to join an exclusive club of Asian nations with space-launch capability.

The Korea Vehicle (KSLV-I), whose two previous launches both ended in failure, will blast off between October 26-31, depending on prevailing weather conditions, the ministry said in a statement.

The first stage of the space vehicle is manufactured by Russia, combined with a solid-fuelled second stage built by South Korea.

Currently, only three Asian countries—China, India and Japan—have successfully launched a satellite into orbit.

In South Korea's first attempt in 2009, the KSLV-I actually attained orbit but faulty release mechanisms prevented proper deployment of the satellite.

A second attempt the following year also ended in failure when the rocket exploded in mid-flight.

Explore further: S. Korea plans fresh rocket launch in October

Related Stories

Moscow, Seoul To Cooperate In Space Exploration

September 28, 2005

A bilateral agreement between Russia and South Korea was signed Tuesday authorizing the building of a space center in South Korea and the training of a Korean astronaut for a mission at the International Space Station, reports ...

Recommended for you

NASA telescope studies quirky comet 45P

November 22, 2017

When comet 45P zipped past Earth early in 2017, researchers observing from NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility, or IRTF, in Hawai'i gave the long-time trekker a thorough astronomical checkup. The results help fill in crucial ...

Uncovering the origins of galaxies' halos

November 21, 2017

Using the Subaru Telescope atop Maunakea, researchers have identified 11 dwarf galaxies and two star-containing halos in the outer region of a large spiral galaxy 25 million light-years away from Earth. The findings, published ...

Cassini image mosaic: A farewell to Saturn

November 21, 2017

In a fitting farewell to the planet that had been its home for over 13 years, the Cassini spacecraft took one last, lingering look at Saturn and its splendid rings during the final leg of its journey and snapped a series ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.