It's true! Scientists HAVE written the world's smallest periodic table

October 5, 2011
It's true! Scientists HAVE written the world's smallest periodic table

(PhysOrg.com) -- The 2012 Guinness World Records has been published and confirms that scientists at The University of Nottingham hold the record for writing the world’s smallest periodic table.

They engraved the table on a strand of hair belonging to Green Chemist Professor Martyn Poliakoff. It took the skills of experts in the University’s Nanotechnology and Nanoscience Centre, a beam of accelerated gallium ions and clever imaging to create a table so small that a million of them could be replicated on a typical post-it note.

Professor Poliakoff said: “I am delighted. In my wildest nightmares, I have never imagined being in the , least of all in connection with my hair! The fact that I am is a tribute to the University’s Nanotechnology Centre.”

Professor Poliakoff is one of the stars of the of Videos: www.periodicvideos.com The world’s tiniest periodic table was presented to him as a birthday present. His contributions to PTOV have turned him and his colleagues into YouTube stars.

Professor Poliakoff is currently on a lecture tour in Australia where his green chemistry and social media work is getting rave reviews in the media. He is travelling with the creator of the Period Table of Videos, Australian, Brady Haran.

Brady said: "We never set out to break a word record, so it's really a pleasant surprise. The main aim of our videos is getting people to think about chemistry. So having our tiny periodic table printed in such a best-seller can only help our cause."

Explore further: Smallest periodic table fits on the side of human hair (w/ Video)

More information: www.physorg.com/news/2010-12-smallest-periodic-table-side-human.html

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New low-cost technique converts bulk alloys to oxide nanowires

January 19, 2017

A simple technique for producing oxide nanowires directly from bulk materials could dramatically lower the cost of producing the one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. That could open the door for a broad range of uses in lightweight ...

Creating atomic scale nanoribbons

January 19, 2017

Silicon crystals are the semiconductors most commonly used to make transistors, which are critical electronic components used to carry out logic operations in computing. However, as faster and more powerful processors are ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Isaacsname
not rated yet Oct 05, 2011
Martyn Poliakoff, I enjoy his appearences on Sixty Symbols.

Kudos to all at the U of Nottingham

Maybe next they can do one on Professor Moriartys 3 day stubble O:
rawa1
not rated yet Oct 05, 2011
This is just an imitation. The smallest periodic table would be a regular grid (optical grid?) with proper atom at each place of it.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.