Sun celebrates solstice with flare and CME

Sun celebrates solstice with flare
The Halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as viewed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory coronograph. Credit: NASA/SOHO

(PhysOrg.com) -- Late in the evening on June 20 the sun emitted a long lasting C7.7 small class flare that peaked around 11:25p.m. EDT. A C-class flare is a relatively small flare.

The flare was associated with a (CME) that bloomed off the sun at 11:09p.m. EDT (0412 UT). The movie shown above was captured by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft.

Sun celebrates solstice with flare
These 3D Heliospheric animated models, developed by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center based at the Goddard Space Flight Center, show how the CME cloud might appear as it sweeps past Earth. Credit: NASA/CCMC

Preliminary modeling shows the CME to be moving in Earth's direction at almost 500 mph (800 km/s). Geomagnetic effects and possible auroras on Earth should be moderate, appearing on June 23.

Sun celebrates solstice with flare
The Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this video of the C7 flare in extreme unltraviolet wavelength at 335 Ĺ. Credit: NASA/SDO


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Citation: Sun celebrates solstice with flare and CME (2011, June 22) retrieved 16 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-06-sun-celebrates-solstice-flare-cme.html
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User comments

Jun 22, 2011
Thanks for the story.

We don't know why, . . . yet, but solar out bursts may be linked to solar slumber.

Like the ill temper of a bear in hibernation.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel

Jun 22, 2011
500 MPH or MPS?

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