Apple starts selling unlocked iPhones in US

(AP) -- Apple is selling "unlocked" iPhones in the U.S. for the first time, allowing owners to switch carriers to a limited extent.

The unlocked 4s are listed Tuesday on Inc.'s website for $649 and $749. They're identical to the version sold for use on AT&T Inc.'s network, but don't require a two-year contract.

The buyer supplies his own Subscriber Identity Module, a card that ties the phone to a network. Apart from AT&T, the only national U.S. carrier that's compatible with the phone is T-Mobile USA, and it can provide only phone calls and low data speeds.

Many overseas carriers are compatible with the phone, so international travelers can switch out their U.S. SIM card with one from the local country to avoid AT&T's international roaming fees.


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Citation: Apple starts selling unlocked iPhones in US (2011, June 14) retrieved 18 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-06-apple-iphones.html
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Jun 14, 2011
I would never own a product that wasn't "unlocked" to begin with. If I had no choice, I'd unlock it myself. You can't tell me how to use a product once I own it. I don't rent.

Jun 15, 2011
so what you are saying is that smart phones are the first phones you have ever bought because they were the first to feature an unlock - unless two companies had similar sim card slots

in the early 2000's it all depended on which carrier you had because not all cell phone companies use the same type of signal to communicate with your phone -- before it was as simple as cdma/tdma/gsm now there are 8 different signals with 4 differnt frequency ranges

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