2 space crews mark 1 week together in orbit

March 5, 2011 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
In this Thursday, March 3, 2011 photo provided by NASA, astronauts Scott Kelly, left, Expedition 26 commander; Cady Coleman, center, Expedition 26 flight engineer; and Michael Barratt, STS-133 mission specialist, watch a monitor in the Unity node of the International Space Station while space shuttle Discovery remains docked with the station. (AP Photo/NASA)

(AP) -- The astronauts aboard the orbiting shuttle-station complex will share a few more maintenance chores before they part company.

On Saturday, the two crews will work on the air system at the . They also will make sure a Japanese cargo carrier is properly loaded with trash. It will be let loose at the end of this month and plunge through the . The vessel is full of packing foam from all the equipment that was delivered by Discovery.

The shuttle arrived last Saturday.

The hatches between the two craft will close Sunday afternoon. And the shuttle will undock first thing Monday.

It's the last voyage for Discovery. It will be retired following Wednesday's touchdown and put in a museum.

Explore further: Shuttle, station astronauts relax before parting

0 shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Tracing aromatic molecules in the early universe

March 22, 2017

A molecule found in car engine exhaust fumes that is thought to have contributed to the origin of life on Earth has made astronomers heavily underestimate the amount of stars that were forming in the early Universe, a University ...

Ice in Ceres' shadowed craters linked to tilt history

March 22, 2017

Dwarf planet Ceres may be hundreds of millions of miles from Jupiter, and even farther from Saturn, but the tremendous influence of gravity from these gas giants has an appreciable effect on Ceres' orientation. In a new study, ...

Sand flow theory could explain water-like streaks on Mars

March 22, 2017

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from France and the Slovak Republic has proposed a theory to explain the water-like streaks that appear seasonally on the surface of Mars, which do not involve water. In their paper published ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.