Marchon glasses go 3D chic

Marchon is making 3D movie viewing chic with designer glasses fit for fashionistas.

The world's third-largest eyewear firm unveiled a collection of at the television-crazed (CES) that runs through Sunday in Las Vegas.

"We believe in the fact that anything you put on your face should be extremely fashionable," Cristin Lyons of Marchon said as the 3D designs debuted on the CES show floor.

"It made sense to put the technology in a fashion piece. Let's be honest, the frames out there now aren't very stylish."

The Marchon glasses were compatible with RealD technology used in 85 percent of 3D theaters, and by extension in versions of films that make it into homes.

The glasses featured light gray lenses that filter out 100 percent of eye-damaging ultraviolet sunlight.

The US-based firm will make its wide array of designer 3D glasses available worldwide in February in what was admittedly a vote in confidence in the future of the film format.

Basic 3D will be priced at 30 dollars, and top-of-the-line frames will cost 150 dollars.

"We have men's, ladies', kids', clip-ons, fit-overs...anyone and everyone can wear these frames," Lyons said. "They are a fashion statement, and you can walk outside with them and they won't throw off your world at all."

Designers that Marchon works with include Calvin Klein, Coach, Disney, Karl Lagerfeld, and Lacoste.

Marchon 3D glasses are based on "passive" viewing technology. Marchon opted not to make "active shutter" glasses that require electronics be built into frames.

Marchon also used CES as a stage to announce that it has been award a US patent for curved lenses it uses in 3D glasses made for films, games and other content in the format.


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(c) 2011 AFP

Citation: Marchon glasses go 3D chic (2011, January 8) retrieved 17 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-01-marchon-glasses-3d-chic.html
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Jan 08, 2011
You know, with all the articles here which show useless 'artists impressions' and mugshots of researchers this is the _one_ article where a picture might actually have been useful.

(Not that a design related issue has anything to do on a science site, but, whatever... )

Jan 09, 2011
Oh yes. I can really tell how stylish they are from this article. Who decides whether they are stylish or not anyway? Maybe we are just supposed to take their word for it?

Jan 09, 2011
Probably pandering to the blind crowd...

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