NanoTube Contest Brings Out the Hollywood Side of Nano Things

February 24, 2009 by Lisa Zyga, Phys.org weblog
The ACS' NanoTube Video Contest encourages entrants to explain "nano" in creative ways, as shown in the submission "Nano Song." Credit: Patrick Bennett and crew.

(PhysOrg.com) -- How would you describe "nano" to someone who had never heard of it before? In a video contest held by the American Chemical Society (ACS), scientists-turned-filmmakers are explaining what exactly nano is, and where the future of nanotechnology is headed.

The NanoTube Contest will be accepting video submissions from January 5 - March 15, 2009. So far, dozens of videos have been entered in categories including "My Research," "Tutorials," and "Data Visualization." As the ACS explains on its Web site, videos will be judged on creativity, scientific clarity of explanation, originality and quality of the video. The winner will receive $500 in cash.

The contest is open to all registered users, and anyone can vote on the videos by rating them. Currently, viewers can watch videos such as French cheese being cut into ever-smaller cubes; the history of nanoparticles before nanotechnology; and a Sesame Street-like musical with puppets called "Nano Song." This last video, created by Berkeley researchers Patrick Bennett and Ryan Miyakawa, is posted here. Be sure to check out the other entries at the ACS NanoTube page.


Join PhysOrg.com on Facebook!
Follow PhysOrg.com on Twitter!

© 2009 PhysOrg.com

Explore further: San Francisco to require permits for rental scooters

Related Stories

San Francisco to require permits for rental scooters

April 18, 2018

San Francisco is ordering three companies that began renting motorized foot-pedal scooters in the city last month to stop operating until they can ensure riders are obeying state laws and that the devices are not a hazard ...

Esports officially arrives in Japan, home of game giants

February 11, 2018

A crowd cheers, banging on balloons, in front of glitzy stages, each with a giant screen. The rising stars at the sprawling Makuhari Messe hall are the quietly seated men in hoodies and T-shirts, with names like Noppi and ...

Recommended for you

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer

April 25, 2018

From cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer ...

Watching nanomaterials form in 4-D

April 25, 2018

When famed physicists Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska first introduced the transmission electron microscope (TEM) in 1933, it allowed researchers to peer inside cells, microorganisms and particles that were once too small to study.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.