U of A device to measure wind on Mars

May 27, 2008

University of Alberta scientist Carlos Lange is thrilled that an instrument he invented, a wind sensor called the Telltale, has successfully landed on Mars.

This is the first time Canadians have been involved with an interplanetary mission and Lange, a mechanical engineering professor, spent four years in preparation for this mission. His work including helping to create the Telltale, which is able to measure winds in the polar region of Mars.

Mars is typically windy and learning more about this aspect of the planet’s climate will help scientists understand the cycle of water on the planet and subsequently identify possible zones that could sustain life.

“For all of us, this interplanetary lander mission is an extraordinary experience,” said Lange.

The concept of the Telltale was created at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and the instrument was constructed in Denmark. The device is a small piece of the Phoenix Mars Lander spacecraft that landed successfully on Mars on Sunday, May 25.

The lander, a joint mission between NASA, the University of Arizona and the Canadian Space Agency, launched from Florida on August 4, 2007.

Source: University of Alberta

Explore further: U of A device to measure wind on Mars will soon be landing

Related Stories

New dreams rise from Phoenix's ashes

November 18, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Carlos Lange has some sentimental thoughts about the shut down of the Phoenix Mars Lander, but science never sleeps and he's set his sights on a new mission to the Red Planet.

Solar wind, moon dust and Martian lights

April 16, 2012

The Canadian Space Agency has funded a University of Alberta-led project to study the effects of solar winds on Earth’s moon and on Mars. The results are anticipated to influence design of spacecraft for robotic and ...

Moroccan desert meteorite delivers Martian secrets

October 11, 2012

(Phys.org)—A meteorite that landed in the Moroccan desert 14 months ago is providing more information about Mars, the planet where it originated. University of Alberta researcher Chris Herd helped in the study of the Tissint ...

Recommended for you

Major space mystery solved using data from student satellite

December 13, 2017

A 60-year-old mystery regarding the source of some energetic and potentially damaging particles in Earth's radiation belts is now solved using data from a shoebox-sized satellite built and operated by University of Colorado ...

Spanning disciplines in the search for life beyond Earth

December 13, 2017

The search for life beyond Earth is riding a surge of creativity and innovation. Following a gold rush of exoplanet discovery over the past two decades, it is time to tackle the next step: determining which of the known exoplanets ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.