Queen of bees dies at 95

September 17, 2007

Renowned bee expert Eva Crane has died in England at age 95, the International Bee Research Association she founded announced.

Crane, who gave up a career in nuclear physics to spread knowledge about bees as a historian, author and archivist, died Sept. 6 in Slough, England, The New York Times reported Sunday.

The scientist traveled the world for 50 years, using modern and primitive means of transport, to find ways bees have been used by humans, the Times said.

Among her discoveries: Babylonians preserved corpses with honey, and the Viet Cong used bees as weapons. She also delighted in uncovering remote pockets where ancient beekeeping methods were still in use.

Crane was born Ethel Eva Widdowson in London June 12, 1912.

No cause of death was reported.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: How bees find their way home

Related Stories

How bees find their way home

October 17, 2017

How can a bee fly straight home in the middle of the night after a complicated route through thick vegetation in search of food? For the first time, researchers have been able to show what happens in the brain of the bee.

Predicting insect feeding preferences after deforestation

October 6, 2017

Like a scene from the movie Alien, insect parasitoids inject their eggs into unsuspecting hosts, their offspring grow and eat from within, eventually bursting out leaving dead, empty host vessels. These tiny predators, many ...

Recommended for you

Metacognition training boosts gen chem exam scores

October 20, 2017

It's a lesson in scholastic humility: You waltz into an exam, confident that you've got a good enough grip on the class material to swing an 80 percent or so, maybe a 90 if some of the questions go your way.

Scientists see order in complex patterns of river deltas

October 19, 2017

River deltas, with their intricate networks of waterways, coastal barrier islands, wetlands and estuaries, often appear to have been formed by random processes, but scientists at the University of California, Irvine and other ...

Six degrees of separation: Why it is a small world after all

October 19, 2017

It's a small world after all - and now science has explained why. A study conducted by the University of Leicester and KU Leuven, Belgium, examined how small worlds emerge spontaneously in all kinds of networks, including ...

Ancient DNA offers new view on saber-toothed cats' past

October 19, 2017

Researchers who've analyzed the complete mitochondrial genomes from ancient samples representing two species of saber-toothed cats have a new take on the animals' history over the last 50,000 years. The data suggest that ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

gmurphy
not rated yet Jun 10, 2009
RIP bee lady

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.