Global warming reaches Mount Everest

March 5, 2007

A French-led study has determined global warming has affected the ice cap on Mount Everest in the heart of the Himalayas.

The French Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change previously found global warming increased the average world temperature by 0.74 degrees Celsius during the last century. However, there is very little information about some parts of the planet, such as central Asia.

A new study by French researchers, in collaboration with Chinese, Russian and U.S. scientists, is said to prove recent warming has also affected the Mount Everest ice cap.

The research appeared in a recent issue of the journal Climate of the Past.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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