Survey: U.S. retailers slow to adopt RFID

May 23, 2006

American retailers are adopting RFID technology to keep track of inventory at only a modest pace, a new survey revealed.

The poll released this week by NCR Corp. found that 9 percent of retailers that responded had adopted a plan to implement radio-frequency identification compared to 44 percent of U.S. manufacturers.

RFID technology is based on small low-power tags that contain a raft of pertinent information that can be read by scanners. Their primary benefit is in the area of inventory control and transportation.

The poll said those retailers that had jumped on the RFID bandwagon expected a resulting increase in revenues and were dedicating more capital to implementation. There was also an increased awareness of RFID technology among mid-level managers and executives.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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