Pike escape over dam feared

May 13, 2006

A heavier-than-normal snow melt could help the voracious non-native northern pike escape from the Plumas County, Calif., reservoir.

Spilled water at Lake Davis would almost certainly send pike into the Feather River and downstream to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, said George Heise, a senior hydraulic engineer with the California Department of Fish and Game.

State fisheries biologists fear the Midwestern species, once released, would decimate the state native fishery, the Sacramento Bee reported.

The lake reached its highest point May 5, when it rose to within 27 inches of spilling over the dam, said Doug Rischbieter, an environmental scientist with the Department of Water Resources, which manages the water in the reservoir.

In 1999, Fish and Game Department officials asked the Department of Water Resources to manage Lake Davis more aggressively to avoid any spilling. They had again found northern pike that summer, two years after completing a controversial chemical treatment designed to eradicate the invasive species.

For the Fish and Game Department, a significant spill of pike represents the environmental equivalent of a break in the dam, said Heise.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Something in the water—life after mercury poisoning

Related Stories

Something in the water—life after mercury poisoning

September 26, 2017

From 1932 to 1968, hundreds of tonnes of mercury seeped into the clear waters of Minamata Bay, Japan, causing health and environmental problems still felt today. As the first global treaty on mercury finally comes into force, ...

Fish respond to predator attack by doubling growth rate

October 17, 2017

Scientists have known for years that when some fish sense predators eating members of their species, they try to depart the scene of the crime and swim toward safer waters. This sensible behavior is exactly what evolution ...

Researchers seek water test for invasive species detection

July 7, 2015

Detecting invasive lake and river species using just a water sample would be a dream come true for wildlife managers and regulators in the state. And University of Maine researchers may soon make this an inexpensive reality.

Identifying Eadgyth

November 26, 2010

When German archaeologists discovered bones in the tomb of Queen Eadgyth in Magdeburg Cathedral, they looked to Bristol to provide the crucial scientific evidence that the remains were indeed those of the English royal. Dr. ...

UK hardware to contribute to the exploration of Mars

July 25, 2007

The Martian surface will be explored for conditions favourable for past or present life thanks to micro-machine technology supplied by Imperial College London. The NASA mission, planned for August 2007, represents the first ...

Recommended for you

Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

November 17, 2017

Nature whispers its stories in a faint molecular language, and Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung and colleagues can finally tell one of those stories this week, thanks to a one-of-a-kind instrument that allowed them ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.