Pesticides found in tobacco smoke

April 18, 2006

Colorado chemists have discovered for the first time government-approved pesticides are present at dangerous levels in tobacco smoke.

The pesticides, approved by the Environmental Protection Agency for use by U.S. tobacco farmers, might produce adverse effects on early development, reproduction and other hormonal processes. Two have been classified as possible human carcinogens.

The previously undetected tobacco smoke pesticides were found by researchers at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colo., using electron monochromator-mass spectrometry. The scientists found three of the pesticides are suspected of being toxic to the human endocrine system, as well as carcinogenic, in a wide sampling of experimental and commercial cigarette smoke samples.

The pesticides, commonly used in tobacco farming practices, survive the combustion process at an estimated level of 10 percent of the original residue on the tobacco.

The total pesticides found were identified as flumetralin, endocrine, pendimethalin and trifluralin

The research appears online in the journal Analytical Chemistry, in an article by John Dane, Crystal Havey and Kent Voorhees.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Weaker breaths in kids linked to early pesticide exposure

Related Stories

Weaker breaths in kids linked to early pesticide exposure

December 3, 2015

Taking a deep breath might be a bit harder for children exposed early in life to a widely used class of pesticides in agriculture, according to a new paper by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley.

Curbing tobacco use by growing less

August 7, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- In China, 350 million people smoke. Each year, 1 million die from smoking. Many more become disabled. Approximately 20 million Chinese farmers produce the world's largest share of tobacco, nearly 40 percent ...

Recommended for you

How to cut your lawn for grasshoppers

November 22, 2017

Picture a grasshopper landing randomly on a lawn of fixed area. If it then jumps a certain distance in a random direction, what shape should the lawn be to maximise the chance that the grasshopper stays on the lawn after ...

New discovery: Common jellyfish is actually two species

November 21, 2017

University of Delaware professor Patrick Gaffney and alumnus Keith Bayha, a research associate with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, have determined that a common sea nettle jellyfish is actually two ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.